This is a store for those who prefer the old to the new;

who prefer character to shine;

who value owning and using a piece of history.

This is a store for those people and the ones who adore them.

This is a store for those who prefer the old to the new;

who prefer character to shine;

who value owning and using a piece of history.

This is a store for those people and the ones who adore them.

  • Tourist's Album of Khajuraho Containing 32 Coloured Photoes, (np,nd [c. 1960?]) 4" x 5.75", 32pp., soft covers, near fine condition
  • Out of stock
    Unknown Print [Malon Blaine?] This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  This appears to be by Malon Blaine but I don't have a way of verifying that.  I know he did illustrate a copy of Memoirs of a Coxcomb (also by Cleland) [Privately Printed, Planet Press New York, 1931] which matches the paper and printing style of the period.
  • Unknown strop 21" x 2.25", leather strop with linen, in rough shape, leather has numerous cuts to middle of leather.
  • Unusual Sex Practices, Porter Davis (Mental Health Press, New York, 1951) 8.5" X 5.25, 64pp, soft-cover pamphlet, good condition for age Contents: The Origin of Chastity, Mohammedan Sex Rules, Immaculate Conceptions, Mutilation of the Sex Organs, Restrictions on Intercourse, Transvestitism among Holy Men, Sex Lives of Priestesses, Menstruation and the Moon, Women and Serpents, Odd Marriage Customs, Religious Prostitution, Ancient Sex Beliefs
  • V Fuzzynuts Presents Barney Google in Horse Flesh / Letta Laye Presents Ella Cinders, (n.p., n.d.) 5" x 3.5", 8pp. double pamphlet, stapled Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s. This book is two books in one, featuring reprints of the originals printed on both sides of the paper. Flip the book over and it's a different book.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, trans. Fernanda Savage (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only. 1921, limited first edition, #1045/1225) 208pp, hardbound,  light purple boards, tan cloth spine with paper label, hand laid paper, top edge inked, others deckled, without the Raymond illustrations, good condition for age, spine yellowed, slight sunning to boards. Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illustrated by Charles Raymond [trans. Fernanda Savage] (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only. 1928, limited edition one of 1250) 288pp, hardbound with slipcase,  purple boards, paper label on spine, mylar protected dust jacket, deckled edges, good condition for age, DJ has some tears and missing pieces, slipcase bumps and rubbing, split open in back, ex libris Sullivan Artemuis Ware Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illustrated by Charles Raymond [trans. Fernanda Savage] (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only, New York, 1928) 218pp, hardbound with slipcase, blue faux sued boards, white spine with gilt titles, deckled edges, dark blue slipcase with orange title on spine, very good condition for age, slipcase bumps and rubbing repair to bottom of spine, book clean, pages in unread condition with some remaining uncut Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Out of stock
    Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Privately Printed for the Sylvan Press, New York, 1947) 140pp, hardbound with dusk jacket, tan boards, red titles on spine, deckled fore-edge, very good condition for age, dust jacket protected by mylar, near fine two blemishes on front cover, interior pages clean Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Out of stock
    Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Privately Printed for Sylvan Press, New York 1947, limited "large paper edition" #289/1499) 8.5" x 10.75", 140pp, hardbound in black pebbled cloth with gilt titles and decorations on front and spine, original mylar dust jacket, frontispiece with tissue guard, bookplate "from the library of Louis T. Milic" Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English. Bookplate: Louis Tonko Milic (1922-2003), was a Croatian by birth. He attended school in France and moved to New York with his mother and sister in 1936 at 13. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in English and comparative literature from GSAS in 1950 and 1963, respectively, with time out for WWII, during which he learned Arabic and was a translator in Iran for the U.S. Army Air Corps. Milic taught at Teachers College from 1955–69. From 1969–78, he chaired the English department at Cleveland State University (CSU) and served on its faculty until his retirement in 1991. His studies focused on 18th-century literature. Milic’s work, A Quantitative Approach to the Style of Jonathan Swift, was among the first studies to use computer analysis in the humanities. He authored three books on stylistics, edited a number of other volumes and published more than 50 scholarly articles. Milic founded and presided over the Cleveland Eighteenth-Century Society. At CSU, he co-founded and co-edited The Gamut, a quarterly journal of ideas and information, which was published for 12 years, until 1992. Milic supported the CSU Poetry Center and helped make it an organization of national prominence. American Council Learned Societies and International Business Machines Corporation fellow, 1967; National Endowment of the Humanities fellow, 1980.
  • Venus in Furs (frontispiece), by Charles Raymond Print from: Venus in Furs Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illus. Charles Raymond (Privately Printed for Subscribers Only, New York, 1928, #523/1250) Image: 6.5" x 10", high-resolution ink-jet print Paper: 8.5" x 11", your choice of 65lb White or 67lb Ivory Parchment
  • Venus School-Mistress, or Birchen Sports, anonymous, Preface by Mary Wilson (Birchopolis for the Delectation of the Amorous and the Instruction of the Amateur in the Year of the Excitement of the Sexes. 1917 [this is most-likely a newly rebound facsimile reprint of said edition, np nd]) 6 3/4" X 4 5/8", 167pp, hardbound no DJ, half-leather, very good condition, owner's signature in blue ink. According to Ashbee, this work probably dates to 1808-10 (by R. Birch, Translator of Manon's Memoirs, printed for Philosemus). It also appears in 1820 and then in 1830, published by George Cannon. This seems to be a reprint of a 1927 version. This edition reads "best and only complete edition" and "Reprinted from the edition of 1788 with a Preface by Mary Wilson, containing some account of the late Mrs. Berkeley". Also contained in this edition are The Charm, The Night School, The Beautiful Jewess, The Butcher's Daughter, Moral Reflections, The Questions for Casuists, Betsy Thoughtless and an extensive appendix with many articles about flagellation.
  • Very Large, artist unknown Print from:  The Modern Eveline; or the adventures of a young lady of quality who was never found out anonymous (Printed for Distribution Amongst Private Subscribers, Paris, 1904 [Miller Brothers, New York, c. 1930]) Image: 6″ x 9″, high-resolution ink-jet print Paper: 8.5″ x 11″, 65lb White paper
  • Vintage Tesco ACADEMIC #1054 Drafting Tool Kit (incomplete, missing 2 pieces)
  • Viola

    $30.00
    anonymous (Paris, France, nd.) 5.5" X 4", 32pp, softcover, good quality for age, illustrated with pornographic photos
  • Warm Suggestions, (Emotion Publishing Co., London - Paris, nd) 16pp., pamphlet, good condition Erotic story and erotic photos.
  • Way out West with the fucking Tiger, A Bungstopper production, (n.p. n.d.) 4.5" x 3", 8pp. pamphlet, stapled Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s.
  • When Mother Was A Girl, no author (n.p. n.d.) 4.5" x 3", 8pp. pamphlet, stapled, middle page detatched. Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s. Their popularity peaked during the Great Depression era. This booklet features a short story and some interesting "ads" in the back.
  • White Rebenque 23" long, flap is 12", white leather with rawhide/sinew stitching and decorations, slight yellowing from age. Beautiful hand-made white leather rebenque 50+ years old. It has decorative rawhide work on the handle and on the strap, using two colors of rawhide. The handle is textured by wrapping a wet cord around it, leaving an imprint on the leather. Rebenque is the name in Brazilian Portuguese for a type of whip used by gauchos in South America. Especially in Argentina, it is the traditional riding, fighting, and punishing whip of the gaucho. It consists of a rawhide wrapped wooden handle with a thong made of a leather strap a little longer than the handle. The wide strap made the rebenque an instrument less severe on the horse than the European riding crop. As the gaucho was never far from the horse, the rebenque was always on him. When not in use, he made a knot with the strap and held the rebenque lazily by the wrist strap with the middle fingers of his hand, or hung it from the handle of his facón knife (as he used the large knife almost horizontally at his back, held by the belt or waistband, the handle protruded from his right side). The rebenque was used also for fighting, as a weapon by itself, when the fight did not merit a knife, or with the strap rolled on his left hand and the handle hanging, as a secondary weapon to the knife in his right hand. Of course, it was also used for domestic punishments, and for quasi-judicial chastisement. A couple of lashes with the rebenque on the bare legs were widely used as a punishment for children, even in the urban areas.
  • Out of stock
    White Rebenque 23" long, flap is 12", white leather with rawhide/sinew stitching and decorations, slight yellowing from age. Beautiful hand-made white leather rebenque 50+ years old. It has decorative rawhide work on the handle and on the strap, using two colors of rawhide. The handle is textured by wrapping a wet cord around it, leaving an imprint on the leather. Rebenque is the name in Brazilian Portuguese for a type of whip used by gauchos in South America. Especially in Argentina, it is the traditional riding, fighting, and punishing whip of the gaucho. It consists of a rawhide wrapped wooden handle with a thong made of a leather strap a little longer than the handle. The wide strap made the rebenque an instrument less severe on the horse than the European riding crop. As the gaucho was never far from the horse, the rebenque was always on him. When not in use, he made a knot with the strap and held the rebenque lazily by the wrist strap with the middle fingers of his hand, or hung it from the handle of his facón knife (as he used the large knife almost horizontally at his back, held by the belt or waistband, the handle protruded from his right side). The rebenque was used also for fighting, as a weapon by itself, when the fight did not merit a knife, or with the strap rolled on his left hand and the handle hanging, as a secondary weapon to the knife in his right hand. Of course, it was also used for domestic punishments, and for quasi-judicial chastisement. A couple of lashes with the rebenque on the bare legs were widely used as a punishment for children, even in the urban areas.
  • With Rod and Whip: A History of Flagellation Among Different Nations, unknown (The Medical Publishing Co., 1903) 8.5" X 5.5", 118pp. Hardbound no DJ, tan cloth boards. Good condition. This content of this book looks to be heavily borrowed from "Flagellation & the Flagellants. A History of the Rod in All Countries from the earliest period to the present time" by Bertram, 1869. Many of the illustrations from that book also appear in this book.
  • Jean de Villiot [George Grassal (Hugues Rebell)] (Charles Carrington, Paris, 1904 [printed "Alençon, Imprimerie Veuve Félix Guy et Cie"]) 6 3/8" X 5", 301pp, soft bound, red cloth spine with titling to paper label, orange paper covers, good condition, crease in lower corner of cover and inch tear along gutter's edge, slightly yellow pages
  • Woman and her Master; an Englishwoman's Adventures in the Madhi's Camp, Jean de Villiot [George Grassal (Hugues Rebell)] (Charles Carrington, Paris, 1904 [printed "Alençon, Imprimerie Veuve Félix Guy et Cie"] stated limited edition 750 copies) 6 3/8" X 5", 301pp, hardbound, red pebbled cloth boards, gilt title on front, no writing on spine, sewn signatures, good condition, some minor bumping and rubbing Jean de Villiot was a pseudonym used by several authors and compilers working for the publisher Charles Carrington writing novels and "studies" concerning flagellation, including Hugues Rebell (Georges Grassal), Hector France, Stéphane Arnoulin and Charles Carrington, himself. This novel is attributed to George Grassal (Hugues Rebell) originally written in French, in 1902, as "La Femme et son maître" (The Woman and her Master). In 1904 "Woman and her Master" was published in English by Charles Carrington. Often these editions were printed unbound and sent to the bookseller to bind to the specifications of their customers. "this book is a witness to the horrors that the power of England has in some degree blotted out by the erection of Schools at Khartoum and Omdurman."
  • Woman and Puppet, Pierre Louys, illustrated by Clara Tice, "designed and supervised by Harry Cunningham" (The Pierre Louys Society, US, 1927, #617/990) 9 7/8" X 6 1/2", 270pp, hardbound with , black boards with red titles and decorations, MINT condition, with dust jacket wrapped in mylar. Bookstore stamp on front paste-down "C. J. Schnieder Books" During the carnival in Seville, the Frenchman André Stévenol meets and falls under the spell of Conception 'Concita' Perez, a young Andalusian woman. His friend, don Mateo Diaz warns him off by describing his own history with the woman – a history of being repeatedly attracted and then rebuffed by her. Conchita continually flirted with other men to torture don Mateo. On each occasion he was made to feel guilty for his jealous thoughts and actions towards her, until he realised finally that he had been her puppet for fourteen months and in an explosion of passion he beat her. She then astonished him by declaring the violence a sign of the strength of his love and came to his bed. She was a virgin. Although the two then started living together, she continued her flirtatious behaviour towards other men and simultaneously became very possessive. Don Mateo left the country and travelled for a year to escape her. The novel has a short epilogue, described as the moral of the piece. The Frenchman accidentally meets Conchita again, and they spend the night together. The next morning, as Conchita packs her bags for Paris, a note is received from don Mateo asking to be taken back into Conchita's good graces. Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French poet and writer, most renowned for lesbian and classical themes in some of his writings. He is known as a writer who "expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection." Woman and Puppet is described as "Spanish romance". The "puppet" in the story refers to men she is able or unable to bend to her will.
  • Woman with Whip, artist unknown Printed from: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure or The Life of Fanny Hill John Cleland (Hoboken, np, 1929 [Philadelphia?] limited edition 700 (unnumbered)) Image: 6″ x 9.5″, high-resolution ink-jet print Paper: 8.5″ x 11″, 65lb White
  • anonymous (Paris, France, nd.) 5.5" X 4.25", 32pp, softcover, good quality for age, illustrated with pornographic photos
  • Wooden Billy Club 12.5" x 2.75" 
  • Yvonne, or the adventures an intrigues of a french governess with her pupils | a real tale [t]ranslated from the french by Mary Suckit, (stated "printed for the Erotica Biblion Society of London and New-York, 1899") 5"x6.25", 138pp, blank softcover "french wraps" protected by mylar, very good condition, some soiling and bumping. This book is similar to the description of the edition that was possibly printed by Gaucher for the Parisian booksellers.  It could be that or a pirate of his edition. From a 1901 advertisement: "Lovers of the strange and new - curious students of the erotic erraticisms of the age - men in fact, of both high & low degree, will read this book muttering of mingled marvel and surprise. This pretty booklet... is a veritable panorama of delights, showing first the emotions and sensations of incipient womanhood when the whole thoughts run in the direction of marriage and its mysteries. It contains, as incidents, Dr. Grosvit’s botanical instruction to young ladies; - his intrigue with Marie the governess of Yvonne; how they seduce their pupil, whose peculiarity and naturally lascivious nature is so easy to corrupt; botanical excursion to Meudon woods; — pisser and pisseuse - feat of love in Dr. Grosvit’s apartments; - Marie’s flying fuck, a railway adventure with a Russian gentleman; - a tale of her early life, seduction by Count Coupine; - lovely pen-pictures of the first act, and the monthly party of the Count’s friends to his chateau in the woods." Copies of the 1899 edition were seized and condemned at the Cours d’assise, Seine, on 23 Dec. 1914. Elias Gaucher (publisher from 1898 until 1925(?)) was a Clandestine editor who mainly used the pseudonym G. Lebaucher, Libraire-Éditeur, Montreal (Canada), but also Maison Mystère, Imprimerie Galante, etc. This publisher published many erotic underground works in English from 1898 to about 1904 with the mentions “Printed for the Erotica Biblion Society of London and New York”, he also published erotic texts in French from 1899. His printing press was actually located at 11 rue Danicourt in Malakoff, France. Gaucher left his works in deposit with booksellers-distributors […] Most editions of Gaucher are counterfeit editions of Brancart or Hirsch, and Gaucher often republished his own works.
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