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  • The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio, trans. John Payne, illust. Louis Chalon (Lawrence and Bullen, London, 1893, #32/1000 hand numbered, first edition thus) 11.25" X 7.5", 325pp 383pp, hardcover, half red morocco over red pebbled boards, gilt titles and decorations on spine, five raised bands, laid paper, top-edge gilt, marbled end papers, 15 full-page B&W Illustrations with tissue guards, good condition for age, some bumping to corners and slight wear, front endpapers on vol. 2 becoming detached but holding, a rare leather-bound copy of an low numbered limited edition. This is a beautifully leather-bound, nicely illustrated late nineteenth century edition of The Decameron from Lawrence and Bullen. The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose. Arthur Henry Bullen, often known as A. H. Bullen, (1857-1920) was an English editor and publisher, and a specialist in 16th and 17th century literature. His father George Bullen was librarian at the British Museum. A. H. Bullen's interest in Elizabethan dramatists and poets started at the City of London School, before he went to Worcester College, Oxford to study classics. His publishing career began with a scholarly edition of the Works of John Day in 1881 and continued with series of English Dramatists and a seven-volume set of Old English Plays, some of which he had discovered in manuscript and published for the first time. Bullen wrote more than 150 articles for the Dictionary of National Biography, lectured on Elizabethan dramatists at Oxford University and taught at Toynbee Hall. In 1891 he and H. W. Lawrence went into partnership as the publishers Lawrence & Bullen. This lasted until 1900 when Bullen moved on to publish as A. H. Bullen. With Frank Sidgwick as partner, he then formed the Shakespeare Head Press for which he is most known.
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    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio, trans. Richard Aldington, illustrated by Rockwell Kent (Garden City Books, Garden City, NY, 1949 [date of illustrations]) 9 1/2" X 6 3/8", 562pp, hardbound with DJ protected by mylar, green boards with cream spine, great condition, "withdrawn" stamped on bottom edge and inside cover. This is the popular (at the time) Garden City edition.  Superb art deco color illustrations throughout by Rockwell Kent (famous illustrator of Moby Dick and others). The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.
  • The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio, trans. Richard Aldington, illustrated by Rockwell Kent (Garden City Books, Garden City, NY, 1949 [date of illustrations]) 9 1/2" X 6 3/8", 562pp, hardbound with DJ (with some rips) protected by mylar, green boards with cream spine, great condition. This is the popular (at the time) Garden City edition.  Superb art deco color illustrations throughout by Rockwell Kent (famous illustrator of Moby Dick and others). The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.
  • The Decameron of Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio, illustrations Leopold Flameng (The Bibliophilist Society, nd [c. 1920? New York?]) 9 5/8" X 6 3/4", 307pp, hardbound black cloth no DJ, top edge dyed blue, fore edge deckle, good condition, spine marked "IIID" binding solid, bumped corners The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.
  • The Decameron of Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio, illustrations Leopold Flameng (The Bibliophilist Society, nd [c. 1940? New York?]) 9 5/8" X 6 3/4", 307pp, hardbound black cloth with DJ, top edge dyed blue, fore edge deckle, good condition, bumped corners, binding solid, dust jacket in very poor shape (fragmented), illustrations on blue paper The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.
  • Out of stock
    The Complete Works of Gaius Petronius: Done into English by Jack Lindsay, with One Hundred Illustrations by Norman Lindsay: Comprising The Satyricon and Poems, Gaius Petronius, trans. & illust. Jack Lindsay (Rarity Press, New York, 1932) 9.5" X 6.5", 183pp, Hardcover no DJ, red cloth boards, botton and fore edges deckled. Good condition for age, a fading on spine, silver gilt lettering and decorations Satyricon is a work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. This edition also contains selected poems by Petronius.
  • The Beautiful Madame Lapuchin, Knouted by order of Elizabeth Empress of Russia, artist unknown Print from: Flagellation & the Flagellants. A History of the Rod in All Countries from the earliest period to the present time The Rev. Wm. M. Cooper, B.A. [James Glass Bertram] (John Camden Hotten, London, n.d. [1869] (first edition)) Image: 7" x 10", high-resolution ink-jet print Paper: 8.5" x 11", your choice of 65lb White or 67lb Ivory Parchment
  • "written by herself" [author unknown, originally printed for George Cannon c. 1830] (Pendulum Books, Atlanta, GA, 1967) 6.75" X 4.25", 127pp. + 16 pages of ads, paperback, good condition for age, some yellowing but in "unread" condition (binding not broken).
  • The Autobiography of a Flea, told in a hop, skip, and jump: Recounting all his Experiences of the Human, and Superhuman, Kind, both Male and Female; with his Curious Connections, Backbitings, and Tickling Touches; the whole scratched together and arranged for the Delectation of the Delicate, and for the Information of the Inquisitive. annonymous [disputed but believed to be Stanislas de Rodes, a London lawyer] ("Published by the Authority of The Phlebotomical Society, Cytheria, 1789 [a false imprint, according to Mendez, most likely printed by A. Lefevre (Brussels) for Mlle. Doucé (Paris) c.1890. It is possible that Charles Carrington introduced Doucé to the book as he just arrived in Paris (exiled from England).]) 4.75" x 7.75", 190pp, full red Moroccan leather with gilt boarders, 5 raised bands, gilt decorations and title on spine, gilt decorations border paste-downs, top edge gilt, no illustrations present, text decorations throughout, boards loose, signatures loose, some pages detached. A good copy of a VERY rare fine-binding edition of a very rare book. I can find no other copies for sale or in WorldCat. Written from the point of view of a very observant flea, the story is of the exploits of a young girl and a monastery of corrupt monks. The prose is very well written, erotic, and entertaining, with detailed full-length descriptions, good scene setting, and tension buildups. A question hangs over its authorship who has been referred to as ‘un avocat anglais, bien connu a` Londres’ [an advocate well known in London], suggested to be Frederick Popham Pike, the only barrister known to be writing pornography at this time. Other contenders for its authorship include Frederick Hankey, who died in 1882, Henry Spencer Ashbee, and the current favorite, Stanislas de Rodes. CHARACTERS The Flea: The Narrator of the story is a flea whose name is never revealed. The novel begins with the flea asserting that though he gets his living by blood sucking he is "not the lowest of that universal fraternity". The flea further asserts that his intelligence and abilities of observation and communication are comparable to a human, and demurs from any explanation of the cause, adding that he is "in truth a most wonderful and exalted insect". The unusual narrator allows the story to be written from the viewpoint of a character who neither participates in nor necessarily approves of the sex scenes, and the movement of the narrator between the bodies of the different characters allows the action to follow different characters at different times. Despite ostensibly being written from the first person the novel includes descriptions of the feelings and intentions of various characters which seem more fitting with a third person limited omniscient narrator. Bella: The main character of the book, Bella, is an orphan who lives with her uncle and aunt. At the beginning of the story she is 14 and is described as being the admired one of all eyes and the desired one of all hearts - at any rate among the male sex. She begins the book sexually naive, but inquisitive. Charlie: Very little description is given of Charlie, and after a brief mention in Chapter 3 he ceases to play any part in the story. Father Ambrose: A priest aged 45, described as having a handsome face, with jet black eyes and as being short and stout. The narrator says Ambrose's mind is dedicated to the pursuit of lust, and much of the novel's plot is due to his machinations. After initiating Bella into the ways of unrestrained sensuality, and planning to keep her for himself, he is discovered by the Brother Superior and Brother Clement who insist he share Bella with them. Many scenes of multiple acts of all varieties ensue. Ultimately, Ambrose decides to expand the circle of debauchery by insisting Belle involve her friend the fair, innocent Julia Delmont. Father Clement: Father Clement is one of the "brothers" of Father Ambrose and is a participant and co conspirator in the seduction of Bella. He is described as ugly and possessed of an absolutely gargantuan penis. A memorable scene occurs when Clement mistakes the bedroom he believes is occupied by Bella, and throws himself on Bella's puritanical and rigid aunt. After initially believing the advances are those of her husband, with whom she has not been intimate in many years, she feels Clement's enormous size, and leaps up. Clement forces her down, and after initial resistance, she succumbs. They are discovered and Clement escapes out the window. Bella's aunt goes progressively insane screaming for the "priest with the big tool". Plot The plot begins with Bella in church. As she leaves, Charlie pushes a note into her hand. She reads that it says he will be in their old meeting place at eight o' clock. She meets him in a garden. After some playful conversation, Charlie introduces her to her first sexual experience. Father Ambrose, who had been hiding in the shrubs, surprises them afterward, scolding both of them for their behaviour and threatening to reveal what they have been doing to their guardians. Bella pleads for mercy. Father Ambrose, appearing to relent, tells Bella to meet him in the sacristy at two o'clock the next day and Charlie to meet him at the same time the day after that. Ambrose instructs Bella into a way she may be absolved of her sins and blackmails her into sex with him, lest he tell her guardian what she was up to. Then Ambrose's colleagues, the Fr Superior & Fr Clement, catch them in the act, and they demand equal rights to Bella's favours. And so Bella is introduced to serving the Holy community in a special way. Despite his promises, Ambrose goes to see Bella's uncle, Monsieur Verbouc and tells of her lewd behaviour. This leads to her uncle, who has long entertained lustful thoughts of his niece, attempting to force himself on Bella. The narrator then intervenes, biting him to put a damper on his ardour. Next, Father Clement, looking for Bella's room, climbs into the window of Bella's aunt, the pious Madame Verbouc, who had mistaken him for her husband. M. Verbouc then bursts in and his wife realises she's actually been making love to the randy priest. Bella's friend, Julia Delmont, becomes Ambrose's next target. By now completely corrupted and happy to go along with whatever Ambrose suggests, Bella readily agrees to the Father's next scheme: She will offer herself to Monsieur Delmont, on condition that her face is covered. The trick is that it will not be Bella who lies there, but Delmont's own daughter. Father Ambrose seduces her and says he will come to her by night and make love to her, but she must hide her face. Charming depiction of a drawing room gangbang from the book When the act is consummated, Bella appears and pretends that it was all a big mistake. But since Delmont has now potentially impregnated his daughter, the only way to be sure his incest cannot be discovered is to have all make love to her as well. In case she is pregnant, nobody can claim that her own father is the father. Bella and Julia eventually become nuns, and the book ends as they participate in an orgy with 19 priests.
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    The Amours of the Chevalier de Faublas | by John Baptiste Louvet de Courvray | founded on historical facts, interspersed with most remarkable narratives | a literal unexpurgated translation from the Paris edition of 1821, etchings by Louis Monzies from drawings of Paul Avril (Privately Printed for Société des Bibliophiles [possibly Charles Carrington], London 1898 #2/100, first English translation edition) 5.75"x8.25", 4 volumes, ix+330pp, 367pp, 416pp, 430pp, white spine over green boards, gilt title ("Classics Facetius | Faublas") and decorations on spine, top edge gilt, others deckled, many pages (including the first page of first chapter!) unopened, slight wear to hinges on vol 1, slight sunning on vol 2 & 4, otherwise in excellent condition for age. Jean-Baptiste Louvet de Couvrai (1760 - 1797) was born in Paris as the son of a stationer, he became a bookseller's clerk, and first attracted attention with the first part of his novel "Les Amours du chevalier de Faublas" (5 parts) in 1787; it was followed in 1788 by "Six semaines de la vie du chevalier de Faublas" (8 parts) and in 1790 by "La Fin des amours du chevalier de Faublas" (6 parts). The heroine, Lodoiska, was modeled on the wife of a jeweler in the Palais Royal, with whom he had an affair. She divorced her husband in 1792 and married Louvet in 1793. This is considered a so-called "libertine" novel. It dwells mainly on the sexual escapades of its hero, a sort of amiable young libertine, and on the corrupted morals of eighteenth-century France. At the start of this novel the young Chevalier de Faublas attends a party dressed as a woman and is knowingly seduced by the lady of the house ('. I receive with equal astonishment and pleasure a charming lesson, which I repeated more than once .') Oxford Comp. to French Literature says it is "typical of many frivolous, licentious novels of its time, and still mentioned. Faublas, the amiable hero, is the victim of his own charms. His amorous adventures, recounted with a certain lively force, begin with his entry into society at the age of sixteen. He loves several women by the way and three in particular. A jealous husband and a despairing suicide reduce the three to one. The novel ends on a moral note: Faublas , who had happened to settle down with his remaining love, is haunted by the avenging phantoms of the other two and goes mad."
  • The Amours of the Chevalier de Faublas | by John Baptiste Louvet de Courvray | founded on historical facts, interspersed with most remarkable narratives | a literal unexpurgated translation from the Paris edition of 1821, etchings by Louis Monzies from drawings of Paul Avril (Privately Printed for Société des Bibliophiles [possibly Charles Carrington], London 1898,  one of 100, first English translation edition) 5.75"x8.25", 4 volumes, ix+330pp, 367pp, 416pp, 430pp, white spine over green boards, gilt title ("Classics Facetius | Faublas") and decorations on spine, top edge gilt, others deckled, many pages unopened, spine slightly soiled, slight sunning, otherwise in excellent condition for age, numerous illustrations with titled tissue guards. This is the first English translation of this work which, when published was a "sensation" all over Europe.  It appears to be published by Charles Carrington, who occasionally used the Société des Bibliophiles imprint and often used illustrations from Paul Avril.  Édouard-Henri Avril (1849-1928) used the pseudonym "Paul Avril" for his erotic work. He was a French painter and commercial artist. His career saw collaboration with influential people like Octave Uzanne, Henry Spencer Ashbee and Friedrich Karl Forberg. He is one of the most celebrated erotic artists of his age. Avril was a soldier before starting his career in art. He was awarded with the Legion of Honour for his actions in the Franco-Prussian War. Jean-Baptiste Louvet de Couvrai (1760 - 1797) was born in Paris as the son of a stationer, he became a bookseller's clerk, and first attracted attention with the first part of his novel "Les Amours du chevalier de Faublas" (5 parts) in 1787; it was followed in 1788 by "Six semaines de la vie du chevalier de Faublas" (8 parts) and in 1790 by "La Fin des amours du chevalier de Faublas" (6 parts). The heroine, Lodoiska, was modeled on the wife of a jeweler in the Palais Royal, with whom he had an affair. She divorced her husband in 1792 and married Louvet in 1793. This is considered a so-called "libertine" novel. It dwells mainly on the sexual escapades of its hero, a sort of amiable young libertine, and on the corrupted morals of eighteenth-century France. At the start of this novel the young Chevalier de Faublas attends a party dressed as a woman and is knowingly seduced by the lady of the house ('. I receive with equal astonishment and pleasure a charming lesson, which I repeated more than once .') Oxford Comp. to French Literature says it is "typical of many frivolous, licentious novels of its time, and still mentioned. Faublas, the amiable hero, is the victim of his own charms. His amorous adventures, recounted with a certain lively force, begin with his entry into society at the age of sixteen. He loves several women by the way and three in particular. A jealous husband and a despairing suicide reduce the three to one. The novel ends on a moral note: Faublas , who had happened to settle down with his remaining love, is haunted by the avenging phantoms of the other two and goes mad."
  • The Amatory Adventures of The Lustful Turk | or | Lascivious Scenes from a Harem | faithfully and vividly depicted in a series of letters from a young and beautiful English lady to her cousin in England, Anonymous ("Paris: Privately Printed, 1904" [this is a later facsimile printing, np nd]) The Lustful Turk, or Lascivious Scenes from a Harem is a pre-Victorian British erotic epistolary novel first published anonymously in 1828. (although this edition says it is "signed 10th of April, 1868) However, it was not widely known or circulated until the 1893 edition. The novel consists largely of a series of letters written by its heroine, Emily Barlow, to her friend, Sylvia Carey. When Emily sails from England for India in June 1814 her ship is attacked by Moorish pirates and she is taken to the harem of Ali, Dey of Algiers. The Dey rapes her and subjects her to his will, awakening her sexual passions. Emily's debasement continues when the Dey insists on anal sex, arousing the horror of her correspondent Sylvia, who expresses her indignation at the Dey's behaviour, in a letter that the latter intercepts. Annoyed at her attitude, the Dey arranges for Sylvia to be abducted and brought to the slave market of Algiers. After an elaborate charade in which the Dey pretends to be a sympathetic Frenchman, bidding to save her from sexual slavery, and engaging her in a fake marriage, he deflowers her and awakens her sexuality, as he had done with Emily. Revealing his true identity the Dey enjoys both girls together. This sexual idyll is eventually terminated when a new addition to harem objects to anal rape and cuts off the Dey's penis with a knife, and then commits suicide. Seemingly unfazed by this, the Dey has "his lost members preserved in spirits of wine in glass vases" which he presents to Emily and Sylvia, sending them back to England with these tokens of his affection. The novel also incorporates interpolated stories concerning the erotic misadventures of three other girls abducted into the harem and enlarges on the fate of Emily's maid Eliza who, presented by the Dey to Muzra, Bey of Tunis, is bound, flogged and raped in turn.
  • The Amatory Adventures of The Lustful Turk | or | Lascivious Scenes from a Harem | faithfully and vividly depicted in a series of letters from a young and beautiful English lady to her cousin in England, Anonymous ("Paris: Privately Printed, 1904" [this is a later facsimile printing, np nd]) The Lustful Turk, or Lascivious Scenes from a Harem is a pre-Victorian British erotic epistolary novel first published anonymously in 1828. (although this edition says it is "signed 10th of April, 1868) However, it was not widely known or circulated until the 1893 edition. The novel consists largely of a series of letters written by its heroine, Emily Barlow, to her friend, Sylvia Carey. When Emily sails from England for India in June 1814 her ship is attacked by Moorish pirates and she is taken to the harem of Ali, Dey of Algiers. The Dey rapes her and subjects her to his will, awakening her sexual passions. Emily's debasement continues when the Dey insists on anal sex, arousing the horror of her correspondent Sylvia, who expresses her indignation at the Dey's behaviour, in a letter that the latter intercepts. Annoyed at her attitude, the Dey arranges for Sylvia to be abducted and brought to the slave market of Algiers. After an elaborate charade in which the Dey pretends to be a sympathetic Frenchman, bidding to save her from sexual slavery, and engaging her in a fake marriage, he deflowers her and awakens her sexuality, as he had done with Emily. Revealing his true identity the Dey enjoys both girls together. This sexual idyll is eventually terminated when a new addition to harem objects to anal rape and cuts off the Dey's penis with a knife, and then commits suicide. Seemingly unfazed by this, the Dey has "his lost members preserved in spirits of wine in glass vases" which he presents to Emily and Sylvia, sending them back to England with these tokens of his affection. The novel also incorporates interpolated stories concerning the erotic misadventures of three other girls abducted into the harem and enlarges on the fate of Emily's maid Eliza who, presented by the Dey to Muzra, Bey of Tunis, is bound, flogged and raped in turn.
  • The Adventures of King Pausole, Pierre Louys, trans. Charles Hope Lumley, illustrated by Beresford Egan (Privately Printed for William Godwin, Inc., New York, 1933) 9 1/2" X 6 1/2", 312pp, hardbound no DJ, red cloth with silver gilting on the spine and a nude woman on the cover, good condition, binding strong, some fading on covers and spine. Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French poet and writer, most renowned for lesbian and classical themes in some of his writings. He is known as a writer who "expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection." This book is a humorous and risqué "libertine" story about a king with many wives (one for each day of the year). As part of the story, King Pausole had two laws "1. hurt no man. 2. Then do as you please."
  • Out of stock
    The Adventures of King Pausole, Pierre Louys, ilustrated by Lotan Welshans ("Privately Printed in a Strictly Limited Edition for Members of The Society of Sophisticates", no date, [c. 1927, the date of the illustrations], [first edition thus]) 9 5/8" X 6 5/8", 305pp, hardbound with dust jacket, boards green with gilt, gilt lettering and designs on spine, top edge gilted, other edges deckle, good condition, binding loose and boards loose but intact, dust jacket in fair condition with a few tears and small portion of spine top torn off. Ex-Libris Duane Bird Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French poet and writer, most renowned for lesbian and classical themes in some of his writings. He is known as a writer who "expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection." This book is a humorous and risqué "libertine" story about a king with many wives (one for each day of the year). As part of the story, King Pausole had two laws "1. hurt no man. 2. Then do as you please."  Spider-webb-patterned tissue coverings on the nine exotic and sensuous plates (gilt on black paper tipped in), by Lotan Weshans.
  • The Adventures of King Pausole, Pierre Louys, trans. Charles Hope Lumley, illustrated by Beresford Egan (The Fortune Press, London, 1929, #333/1200, "printed at Leige by the Imprimerie Vaillant-Carmanne - M. C. M. XXIX") 9 1/4" X 7", 312pp, hardbound no DJ, quarter cloth, marbled boards, gilt lettering on spine, printed on "batchelor hand-made paper", top edge gilted other edges deckle, in good condition, corners are bumped, some pages remain uncut, spine slightly cocked, some light rubbing to tail some pages remain unread/uncut Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French poet and writer, most renowned for lesbian and classical themes in some of his writings. He is known as a writer who "expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection." This book is a humorous and risqué "libertine" story about a king with many wives (one for each day of the year). As part of the story, King Pausole had two laws "1. hurt no man. 2. Then do as you please." This law has been embraced many including pagan/wiccan community when Aleister Crowley introduced this as his "First Law". First English edition, 6 full page colour plates by Beresford.
  • The Adventures of King Pausole, Pierre Louys, ilustrated by Lotan Welshans ("Privately Printed in a Strictly Limited Edition for Members of The Society of Sophisticates", no date, [c. 1927, the date of the illustrations], [first edition thus]) 9 5/8" X 6 5/8", 305pp, hardbound, no dust jacket, boards green floral pattern, gilt lettering and designs on spine, top edge gilted, other edges deckle, good condition. Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French poet and writer, most renowned for lesbian and classical themes in some of his writings. He is known as a writer who "expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection." This book is a humorous and risqué "libertine" story about a king with many wives (one for each day of the year). As part of the story, King Pausole had two laws "1. harm no man. 2. Then do as you please." Spider-webb-patterned tissue coverings on the nine exotic and sensuous plates (gilt on black paper tipped in), by Lotan Weshans.
  • That's My Pop, (np. nd.) 4.5" x 3", 8pp.+2 pages describing sexual positions, pamphlet, stapled Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s.
  • Out of stock

    Thais

    $130.00
    Thais, Anatole France, trans. Robert B. Douglas, illus. by Martin van Maële (Charles Carrington, London, 1901 [first english translation, first edition, limited edition, one of 500]) 6"x9", x+304pp, hardbound, blue moire silk boards with blind stamped borders, gilt titles on spine, deckled edges, Van Gelder hand-made paper, beautiful tipped-in illustrations protected by tissue guard and printed in combination of black & brown ink, good condition, bumping to corners, some sunning to spine, slight foxing to prelims, interior pages clean Thaïs is a novel by French writer Anatole France, published in 1890 and considered one of his best works. It is based on events in the life of Saint Thaïs of Egypt, a legendary convert to Christianity who is said to have lived in the 4th century. In the story, Paphnuce, an ascetic hermit of the Egyptian desert, journeys to Alexandria to find Thais, the libertine beauty whom he knew as a youth. Masquerading as a dandy, he is able to speak with her about eternity; surprisingly he succeeds in converting her to Christianity. Yet on their return to the desert he becomes fascinated with her former life. She enters a convent to repent of her sins. He cannot forget the pull of her famous beauty, and becomes confused about the values of life. Later, as she is dying and can only see heaven opening before her, he comes to her side and tells her that her faith is an illusion, and that he loves her. Anatole France (François-Anatole Thibault 1844-1924) was a French poet, journalist, and novelist. He was a successful novelist, with several best-sellers. Ironic and skeptical, he was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was a member of the Académie française, and won the 1921 Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of his brilliant literary achievements, characterized as they are by a nobility of style, a profound human sympathy, grace, and a true Gallic temperament". France is also widely believed to be the model for narrator Marcel's literary idol Bergotte in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. Maurice François Alfred Martin van Miële (1863-5 - 1926), better known by his pseudonym Martin van Maële, was a French illustrator of early 20th century literature. Though he gained notoriety with his illustration for H. G. Wells in Les Premiers Hommes dans la Lune, and he worked as an illustrator for the Félix Juven's French translations of the Sherlock Holmes series, he is now most widely renowned and mostly remembered for his erotic illustrations.
  • Tales of Firenzuola | Benedictine Monk of Vallombrosa | (XVIth century) | first time translated into English, Agnolo Firenzuola (Isidore Liseux, Paris, 1889) 4.25" x 6.5", xix+180pp., full soft red morroco binding with gilt borders,  decorated end papers, deckled edges, hand laid paper, unique frontispiece illustration tipped in, not seen in any other copies online, title page in red and black, good minus condition, corners bumped top of spine is torn, .5" inch of bottom of spine is missing This copy is a rare all-leather first-edition.  I have not seen any other copies with this frontispiece and know nothing about it's origin. Originally written in Italian titled Ragionamenti Amorosi (Amorous Reasons), the Tales were written in 1523-24 on the Boccaccian premise of a group of young ladies and gentlemen gathered in a Tuscan villa to tell each other, in turn, stories dealing with love, fortune, fate, virtue, etc. The stories themselves, in their variety and immediacy, offer an insight into sixteenth-century Italian society and its concerns. Agnolo Firenzuola (1493–1545), an Italian poet and littérateur, was born in Florence, September 28th, 1493. He received his name from the town of Firenzaola among the Apennines, where his family originated. Agnolo spent his youth in Siena and Perugia, studying law and living a "life of pleasure". For a short time he practiced law in Rome, but abandoned it to become a monk at Vallombrosa. After the death of Clement VII. he went to Florence, and finally settled at Prato as abbot of San Salvatore. Some authorities have disputed that he ever became an abbot, for the records of his dissolute career do not accord with a monastic life. But whether abbot or gentleman of leisure, a severe illness took him to Prato, where he spent many happy years. He died there or at Rome, about 1545. Firenzuola wrote satirical and burlesque poems; two comedies, ‘I Lucidi’ and ‘La Trinuzia’; ‘Discorsi degli Animali,’ imitations of Oriental fables of animals; ‘Ragionamenti Amorosi,’ novelettes or tales after the fashion of Boccaccio; ‘Dialogo della Bellezza delle Donne,’ and other works. He also wrote a few love poems and ballads, one of the most admired of which is ‘Orozza Pastorella.’ Isidore Liseux (1835-1894) was a French bibliophile and publisher of erotica and curiosa. His publications were mostly rare texts of 16th to 18th century authors, hard to find and little known books which were usually translated and annotated by his friend and associate Alcide Bonneau or by Liseux himself. Liseux and Bonneau, both ex-priests, knew each other since seminary. His books were published in small numbers, on high quality paper, and with excellent typography. His usual printers were Claude Motteroz, Antoine Bécus, and later Charles Unsinger. Liseux's books were published openly as the climate was more permissive in Paris at the time. His books were so well regarded that pirates of his books and even unrelated books bearing his imprint with a false date were published clandestinely into the 20th century. French poet, Guillaume Apollinaire wrote: "The publications of Liseux are more and more sought after because they are correct, beautiful and rare." (Le flaneur des deux rives, 1918).
  • Out of stock
    Tales and Novels of J. De La Fontaine with 12 original etchings by Clara Tice ("Privately Printed at the printing house of G. J. Thieme, Nijmegen - Holland, 1929, first edition thus [#472/990 signed by Clara Tice) 6.5"x10", 2 vol. xvi+204pp; xvi+271pp, light blue boards with vellum spine, poor copy, spine is missing from vol. 2, soiling and stains throughout including some of the illustrations, boards loose, vol. 2 back board detached Jean de La Fontaine (1621-1695) was a French fabulist and one of the most widely read French poets of the 17th century. After a long period of royal suspicion, he was admitted to the French Academy and his reputation in France has never faded since. Evidence of this is found in the many pictures and statues of the writer, as well as later depictions on medals, coins and postage stamps. The numerous works of La Fontaine fall into three traditional divisions: the Fables, the Tales and the miscellaneous (including dramatic) works. He is best known for the first of these, in which a tradition of fable collecting in French verse reaching back to the Middle Ages was brought to a peak. He published 245 fables, across twelve books between 1668 and 1694, exemplify the grace and wit of his age. Unlike many of his models, his fables function less as didactic tools and more as entertaining art. His beasts, humans, and plants are not merely moral-serving abstractions but rather lively actors in elegantly described escapades. Almost equally as popular in their time, his "tales", Contes et nouvelles en vers (1665), is an anthology of various ribald short stories and novellas collected and versified from prose. They were particularly marked by their archly licentious tone. La Fontaine drew from several French and Italian works of the 15th and 16th centuries, among them The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Ludovico Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Antoine de la Sale's collection Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, and the work of Bonaventure des Périers.
  • Tales and Novels in verse by J. De La Fontaine, with one hundred and twenty-three engravings by and after Einsen, Lancret, Boucher, Pater, etc. printed from original copper plates (Printed for The Society of English Bibliophilists, London, nd.[1896 first edition, limited edition, one of 520]) 7.25"x10", 2 vol. xix+235pp; xvi+241pp, Very rare full leather, fine binding, copy of equally rare book, gilt borders on boards, gilt titles and decorations on spine, 5 raised bands, marbled pastedowns with gilt decorations on edge, top edge gilt, other edges deckled, good+ condition, very minor foxing as befits its age, some cracking/splitting at top and bottom of spines Jean de La Fontaine (1621-1695) was a French fabulist and one of the most widely read French poets of the 17th century. After a long period of royal suspicion, he was admitted to the French Academy and his reputation in France has never faded since. Evidence of this is found in the many pictures and statues of the writer, as well as later depictions on medals, coins and postage stamps. The numerous works of La Fontaine fall into three traditional divisions: the Fables, the Tales and the miscellaneous (including dramatic) works. He is best known for the first of these, in which a tradition of fable collecting in French verse reaching back to the Middle Ages was brought to a peak. He published 245 fables, across twelve books between 1668 and 1694, exemplify the grace and wit of his age. Unlike many of his models, his fables function less as didactic tools and more as entertaining art. His beasts, humans, and plants are not merely moral-serving abstractions but rather lively actors in elegantly described escapades. Almost equally as popular in their time, his "tales", Contes et nouvelles en vers (1665), is an anthology of various ribald short stories and novellas collected and versified from prose. They were particularly marked by their archly licentious tone. La Fontaine drew from several French and Italian works of the 15th and 16th centuries, among them The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Ludovico Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Antoine de la Sale's collection Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, and the work of Bonaventure des Périers.
  • Tableau de l’amour conjugal, ou l'Histoire complète de la génération de l’homme, Nicolas Venette (Claude Joly, Cologne 1712) 3.75"x6", 22+384pp +4, full calf, 5 raised bands, gilt titles and decorations on spine, front boards loose, good condition for age. Illustrated throughout. Nicolas Venette (1633–1698) was a physician, sexologist and French writer. Born in La Rochelle, he studied medicine at Bordeaux where he received his doctorate in 1656. He then went to Paris where he studied under Guy Patin and Pierre Petit, before travelling to Spain, Portugal and Italy. He then returned to La Rochelle, where he became Regius Professor of Anatomy and Surgery in 1668. First published in Amsterdam in 1686 as Tableau de l'amour humain considéré dans l'état du mariage (Table of human love considered in the state of marriage) under the pseudonym Salocini Venetian (anagram of Nicolas Venette), this book, more properly titled Table of conjugal love, or the complete history of the generation of man,  is considered to be the first treatise on sexology in West.  It proved to be a bestseller and was translated into English, Spanish, German and Dutch.  There were 33 editions published sporadically until 1903.  This is a rare earlier version, published in 1712. The author discusses four sub-topics with respect to sex: anatomy, reproduction, desire, and impotence/infertility. For each topic, he reviews ancient and medieval authors, adding his own observations or those of later authors, and comments where common sense prevails. The resulting composition has an ambiguous mixture of seriousness and light-heartedness bordering upon erotic literature.
  • Suspended, artist unknown Print from:  l'Histoire de Juliette Marquis de Sade (Hollande, 1797) Image: 6" x 9.5", high-resolution ink-jet print Paper: 8.5" x 11", your choice of 65lb White or 67lb Ivory Parchment
  • Out of stock
    Strange Sexual Practises in all Races of the World, Dr. Iwan Bloch, trans. Keene Wallis (Fallstaff Press Inc., New York, 1933, Limited Edition numbered #1808/3000) 9 1/2" X 6 1/4", 246pp, Hardbound no DJ, top edge inked in blue, good condition, bumped and worn edges, back cover design worn at top. Iwan Bloch (1872-1922), the "father of sexology", was a Berlin dermatologist. His many socio-cultural studies in sexology earned him an international reputation as a medical historian. He also discovered de Sade's manuscript of the "120 days of Sodom" in 1904, which had been believed to be lost. He often published his more controversial works under the pseudonym of Eugène DŸhren. This book is a translation of Bloch's "contributions to the Etiology of Psychopathia Sexualis" (not to be confused with the famous book, Psychopathia Sexualis, by Richard von Krafft-Ebing). Chapters include "Strange Sex Life Among Primitive and Civilized Peoples", "Roots of Perversions in all Races and all Ages - Greek Loves and Primitive Refinements", "Savage Lesbian Love - Indians", "Universal Anthropologic Phenomena of the Erotic Urge - Sexual Magic, Witchcraft and Asceticism", "Universal Human Desire for Variation in Sexual Relations" and "Obscene Paintings and Sculpture - Pornographic Photographs and Albums"
  • Stories of Boccaccio (The Decameron), Giovanni Boccaccio, stated "eleven original etchings by Leopold Flameng" [actually P. Teyssonnieres] (Published for the Trade, London, nd [c. 1920?]) 8 1/8" X 5 5/8", 2 vol. in one, 310+307pp, hardbound no DJ, red cloth boards, top edge gilt, others are deckle, less than good condition, binding intact, boards soiled and loose but intact The Decameron, (subtitled Prencipe Galeotto or Prince Galehaut), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. To make their exile more pleasant each of the ten tells the others one story every day. The Decameron records the narratives of ten days -- 100 stories. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. These tales run the entire range of human emotion: grief, love, humor, anger, revenge. Many are based on oral folklore. Boccaccio's ten narrators thus retell already familiar stories about errant priests, rascally husbands, and mischievous wives. Variants of these stories are known in many cultures, but no one formulates them more cleverly or relates them more eloquently than does Boccaccio. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence, it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.
  • Fitzgerald Mfg. Co., works c. 1927 Actress Colleen Moore using a Star-Rite electric massage vibrator in Hollywood.
  • Stag Night, by Phillips Rogers (Prentice-Hall, Inc, New York, 1946) 6" x 8.5", 230pp, hardcover with DJ, red boards with black titles on spine, DJ in fair shape, yellowing throughout, binding good [from Dust Jacket] "Stag Night is a revealing novel about an affair that the men reminisce over for a year and their wives wonder about--the annual Gentleman's Dinner at a country club." "The entire action of Stag Night takes place in one evening at a country club.  It begins with the arrival of a tightly girdled whisky-loving Mrs. Riordan ("Fatima") who has for many years given her Dance of the Seven Veils at the Gentleman's Dinner.  It ends with tactful and wise Heinz, the head waiter, bidding the police goodnight.  In between is depicted the frenzied activity of the chef and the dour bartender, the ribald behavior of some of the stags, the bewilderment of an innocent young refugee dancer, and the mounting excitement as the moment nears for the showing of lewd movies.  Tragedy in a grotesque form stalks the evening and at the climax the diners receive the surprise of their lives — and we don't mean the cops in the hall."
  • Spalding Softball Bat 33", 2" wide, in rough condition, handle and tip chipped/gouged states "Soft Ball | Spaulding Trade Mark | No. S | Air Dried | Made in Canada"
  • Some Limericks: Collected for the use of Students, & ensplendour’d with Introduction, Geographical Index, and with Notes Explanatory and Critical, by Norman Douglas (Nicholson and Whitney, Boston, 1942 [most likely published in Paris by Maurice Girodias of Olympia Press, early 1950's, a reprint of the Obelisk Press edition of 1939], stated 616/1000 "printed by The Brownbent Press, Boston, Mass.") 5.5" x 8.25", 117pp, near fine condition, unlabeled soft covers, dust jacket slightly warn at top with paper label "Some Limericks", spine of dust jacket simply reads "poems". Norman Douglas is an English author best known for his 1917 novel, South Wind. However, this particular book of his is one of the most pirated books of it's kind. Unable to find a publisher willing to take it on, Douglas published it himself in 1928. It was published by Oblisk Press in 1939 (said to be the last book secured for the company before Jack Kahane's lifetime). This particular edition was published by Mr. Kahane's son, Maurice Girodias, who inherited his father's press, but changed the name to Olympia Press. It is said that this book has everything, blasphemy, incest, paedophilia, bestiality. Accompanying each limericks are entertaining (if not scholarly) notes explaining the supposed origin and/or circumstances by which the rhymes were procured. So obscene and offensive, even Olympia Press, known for it's erotic literature, chose to publish under a false imprint.  
  • Smiling Jack in "A Forced Landing", (n.p. n.d.) 4.5" x 3", 8pp. pamphlet, stapled Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s.
  • Small Celluloid Mirror with Bevelled Glass 9 1/4" X 5 3/8", celluloid yellowed with age. 1920-30's celluloid (also known as "French Ivory") mirror with beveled glass.
  • SIXTY EROTIC ENGRAVINGS FROM JULIETTE, Marquise De Sade (Grove Press, Inc., New York, 1969 [first printing]) 11 3/8" X 9 1/2", 60pp, hardback no DJ, good condition 1797 The Marquis de Sade published "Justine, or the Misfortunes of Virtue" and "Juliette or the Prosperity of Vice" (or "vice amply rewarded") together forming 10 volumes of nearly 4000 pages in total; publication was completed in 1801 and included around 100 very explicit engravings. Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette, and as a result Sade was incarcerated for the last 13 years of his life. Napoleon called the work "the most abominable book ever engendered by the most depraved imagination". Justine and Juliette were published sporadically from the 19th century into the mid 20th century but mostly without any of the engravings from the original. The engravings which appear in this book were reproduced from a copy of that famous 1797 Holland edition. This publication marks the first legal printing of these engravings in the US.
  • anonymous (Bibliotheque St. Germaine, Paris, nd. ) 5.25" X 4", 32pp, softcover, good quality for age, very pornographic photos and cartoons.
  • Sexual Symbolism: A History of Phallic Worship, Richard Payne Night & Thomas Wright, intro by Ashley Montagu (The Julia Press, Inc., New York, 1962) 9.5" X 6.5", 217pp + 196pp, hardbound with dustjacket, good condition for age, a few tears in the dustjacket A reprinting of two earlier works with an introduction by Ashley Montagu. The works are: "A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus, and it's connection with the mystic theology of the ancients" [1786] by Richard Payne Knight "to which is added an account of the remains of the worship of priapus lately existing at isernia in the kingdom of Naples by Sir William Hamilton, K.B." and "The Worship of the Generative Powers" [1866] by Thomas Wright
  • Richard Payne Night & Thomas Wright, intro by Ashley Montagu (The Julia Press, Inc., New York, 1966) 9.5" X 6.5", 217pp + 196pp, paperback
  • Sextravaganza, by M. de Crebillon le Fils, With and Introduction by Escar Levine, Illustrator unknown (Privately Printed [The Robin Hood House], New York 1932, one of 1111) 6.25"x9.5", 192pp, decorated boards, vellum spine with silver lettering, some spots and bumps but generally a good copy of this edition. Originally titled La Nuit et le moment ou les matines de Cythère [The night and the moment, or the mornings of Cythere], this is Robin Hood House's famous US "private" publication from the 30's and for a long time the only english translation available in the states.  Written as a dialog, in the course of one night a man and a woman, each of whom is in love with somebody else, gradually warm up to each other until they forget past pleasures in present passions . Satire, irony, word-play and scandal abound.  This edition states "only eleven hundred eleven copies have been issued for collectors of curiosa & sexualia". Claude Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon (1707-1777) was a French novelist. He was called "Crébillon fils" to distinguish him from his father, a famous tragedian, Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon. The publication of Tanzaï et Neadarne, histoire japonaise (1734), which contained thinly veiled attacks on the Papal bull Unigenitus, the cardinal de Rohan and others, landed him briefly in the prison at Vincennes. Publication of Le Sopha, conte moral, an erotic political satire, in 1742 forced him into exile from Paris for several months.
  • Sex To-Day in Wedded Life / Doctor's Confidential Advice, by Edward Podolsky, M.D., Winfield Scott Pugh, M.D. (Simon Pubications, New York, 1947) xx+99pp, hardbound with dusk jacket, red boards with black decorations and titles on spine, very good condition for age, few smalll tears in dust jacket, interior pages and illustrations clean
  • Out of stock
    Self and Sex Series: What a Young Girl Ought to Know; What a Young Woman Ought to Know; What a Young Wife Ought to Know; What a Woman of 45 Ought to Know, Mrs. Mary Wood-Allen, M.D., Mrs. Emma F. Angell Drake, M.D. (The John C. Winston Co., Philadelphia, PA., 1928, 1928, 1935, 1928) 7" x 5", 194pp 272pp 286pp 211pp, hardbound in blue cloth with original dust jackets. Includes a few post cards for a gift subscription to "Better Living, a periodical devoted to the cause of Healthful and clean manhood." Complete set of female "Self and Sex Series" books: "for our little daughter who now has the opportunity of hearing the story of life told by a loving mother"|"To the daughter dear, whose intimate and confidential companionship from childhood to womanhood has made it possible for the author to feel a sympathetic interest in the life problems of all girls"|"To the Young Wives Who Desire the Best for Themselves, for their Husbands and for their Offspring"|"for the woman of forty-five and beyond who desires to enter fittingly prepared into the period of middle life"
  • Selections from the Poetical Works of A. C. Swinburne, from the latest English edition of his works., A. C. Swinburne, ed. R. H. Stoddard (Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., New York, 1884 [first edition, thus.]) 7.5" x 5", xxii, 634pp, Hardcover, raised and gilted blue cloth decorated binding. Gilt edges internal pages framed in red lines. Good condition, bumped and worn corners and spine. Binding tight. Signed by previous owner "Ray E. Searls 1900" Swinburne was an English poet, playwright, novelist, and critic. Considered a decadent poet, although Swinburne perhaps professed to more vice than he actually indulged in; Oscar Wilde stated that Swinburne was "a braggart in matters of vice, who had done everything he could to convince his fellow citizens of his homosexuality and bestiality without being in the slightest degree a homosexual or a bestializer." He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in every year from 1903 to 1907 and again in 1909.
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