• Fids

    Fids (7)

  • Postcard

    Postcard (4)

  • Strops

    Strops (4)

  • Vanity

    Vanity (4)

  • Whips

    Whips (2)

  • Boy with whip "'Tis sweet to love but oh how bitter; To love a girl and then not get her" postcard, writing on the back
  • 22 inch Hardwood Fid (cherry?) 22" X 3.75" c.1800. A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing.
  • A-1 Razor Strop 24" x 2.5", leather strop states "A-1 EXTRA HEAVY SHELL | Finest Selected | Hand Finished" at bottom states "188 | Peter J. Michels, Inc. Brooklyne - N.Y."
  • Bamboo Cane 36", bamboo
  • Blond wood Fid (maple?) 12 1/2", three bands around the top A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing. The markings are made by the sailor who owned it, to distiguish it from the other sailors' fids.
  • Brush & Grooming Set 6.5" x 2.25", includes comb, shoehorn, nail file, nail scissors, beard scissors, tweezers
  • Bucheimer Police Baton Belt Ring 2" rings, leather 4.5" folded over, slight rust on metal rings, leather is worn in places, all snaps work perfectly

    Bucheimer (pronounced boo-shimmer) was born in 1884, as the American manufacturer of original designs in leather goods. Bucheimer’s legacy includes leather goods for both personal and commercial use. In the first half of the 20th century, Bucheimer produced small leather goods; including, the first ever chain wallet, also known as the trucker’s wallet. Beginning in the 1960’s, Bucheimer was awarded the contract to produce the U.S. Post Office mail bag, and leather works for the NYPD, including the NYPD holster, and the NYPD saddle.  Also produced were billy clubs, slap-jacks, and other police items.

  • Camel Brand Razor Strop 24" x 2.5", leather strop, starting to split in middle at fold states "Camel Brand" and lower states "Certifyd | Sanitary Select | Will Beat 'em All Like Certified Checks | 100% Positive Value | Made in U.S.A. | 124"
  • Ce n'est rien... N'ayez pas peur! [It's nothing .. Do not be afraid!], post card (D. D. déposé)
  • Out of stock
  • Dexter no. 11 Wallpaper Seam Roller 6" long, sturdy
  • Fid (Lignum Vitae) 15" long, 1.75" at widest part A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing. Lignum vitae is a wood from trees of the genus Guaiacum. The trees are indigenous to the Caribbean and the northern coast of South America and have been an important export crop to Europe since the beginning of the 16th century. The wood was once very important for applications requiring a material with its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness, and density. "Lignum vitae" is Latin for "wood of life", and derives its name from its medicinal uses; lignum vitae resin has been used to treat a variety of medical conditions from coughs to arthritis, and chips of the wood can also be used to brew a tea. Lignum vitae is also one of the numerous hard, dense woods loosely referred to as "ironwood". Lignum vitae is hard and durable, and is also the densest wood tradedm so dense it will easily sink in water. The belaying pins and deadeyes aboard USS Constitution and many other sailing ships were made from lignum vitae. Due to its density and natural oils, they rarely require replacement, despite the severity of typical marine weathering conditions, and also resisted jamming in their mortise holes. It is no accident that they were the preferred wood for fids. The sheaves of blocks on sailing vessels were made of lignum vitae until the introduction of modern synthetics.
  • Fid (Lignum Vitae) 8.5" long, 1" at widest part A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing. Lignum vitae is a wood from trees of the genus Guaiacum. The trees are indigenous to the Caribbean and the northern coast of South America and have been an important export crop to Europe since the beginning of the 16th century. The wood was once very important for applications requiring a material with its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness, and density. "Lignum vitae" is Latin for "wood of life", and derives its name from its medicinal uses; lignum vitae resin has been used to treat a variety of medical conditions from coughs to arthritis, and chips of the wood can also be used to brew a tea. Lignum vitae is also one of the numerous hard, dense woods loosely referred to as "ironwood". Lignum vitae is hard and durable, and is also the densest wood tradedm so dense it will easily sink in water. The belaying pins and deadeyes aboard USS Constitution and many other sailing ships were made from lignum vitae. Due to its density and natural oils, they rarely require replacement, despite the severity of typical marine weathering conditions, and also resisted jamming in their mortise holes. It is no accident that they were the preferred wood for fids. The sheaves of blocks on sailing vessels were made of lignum vitae until the introduction of modern synthetics.
  • Out of stock
    Fid from India 13.5" long, 1.5" at widest part, unknown wood, with original rope A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing.
  • Fid from India 14.25" long, 1.5" at widest part, unknown wood A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing.
  • German WWI Soldier Postcard German postcard from around 1918, "Immer feste drauf" (always fixed on it)
  • Glass Negative (collodion) Bellboy and Chambermaid 7" X 5" collodion glass negative c.1900 in VERY good condition for age, very little flaking at corners. There are two photos on this glass plate negative. The first has the chambermaid naked from the waist down with her legs spread. The bellboy looks to be getting ready to insert the handle of a cane into her. The second photo is of the chanbermaid, still naked from the waist down, performing oral sex on the bellboy.
  • Glass Negative (collodion) ménage à trois, unknown () 4.5" X 3.5" collodion glass negative c.1900 in VERY good condition for age, very little flaking at corners. Picture is of a man and two women having sex. One woman is straddling the man (whose face is not visible) the other woman has a hold of the man's penis and to insert into the other woman.
  • Glass Negative (collodion) Oral sex 4.5" X 3.5" collodion glass negative c.1900 in fair condition for age, very little flaking at corners but lightly exposed and many scratches. Picture is of a young man with his hips on the arm of a couch, his face hidden. The woman has his penis in her hands and she is licking the tip of the penis.