• The Satyricon of Petronius, Gaius Petronius [stated "Translated by Sebastian Melmoth (Oscar Wilde)" although some believe it was Alfred R. Allinson] (Charles Carrington, Paris, 1902 [#1/515]) 8" X 6", 421pp+1 ads, full red morroco with five raised bands and gilt title on spine, gilt monogram "TKD" on front board, marbled end-papers and paste-downs with gilt decorations on leather around edge, top edge gilt, others deckled, title page in black and red, red printed inset text throughout. Fine example of a VERY rare book. A classic work of translated Latin fiction, consisting of prose and poetry, believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius. The text details the relationship of the narrator, Encolpius and his handsome sixteen year old male lover, who is continually enticed away by others. There is some doubt whether Wilde actually undertook this translation despite the printed slip on the title page. Some consider this to be the first unexpurgated translation of the Satyricon into the English language.
  • Contemporary Portraits, Frank Harris (Mitchell Kennerley, New York, 1915 [first edition]) 8.5" X 5.75", vii 346pp, hardbound, green cloth boards with gilt titles on spine and cover, top edge gilt others deckled, good condition, minor shelf wear and bumping to corners, hinges and binding good. Illustrated with 8 portraits. Owner's(?) signature with date, july 1, 1915. Frank Harris (1856-1931) was an editor, journalist and publisher. Though he attracted much attention during his life for his irascible, aggressive personality, editorship of famous periodicals, and friendship with the talented and famous, he is remembered mainly for his multiple-volume memoir My Life and Loves, which was banned in countries around the world for its sexual explicitness. In this volume, he offers short "portraits" of famous people he has gotten to know, Oscar Wilde, Sir. Richard Burton, Swinburne, Guy de Maupassant, Anatole France, among others.
  • My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, Lord Alfred Douglas (Coventry House, New York, 1932) 9.25" X 6.25", 307pp., hardbound, no DJ, frontis + 5 plates, blue cloth boards, paper label to spine, title page in black and green. "American Edition" revised and corrected from 1929 version with preface by author. Good condition, binding loose, but holding, spine and boards slightly faded, corners bumped. This is the renamed "American Edition" of the UK book, "The Autobiography of Lord Alfred Douglas". Both books are equally rare and hard to find. From the publisher: "Like most of Wilde's adherents, Douglas possesses a charming simplicity; an expected naiveté for one whose life has been so filled with the hates and prejudices of a bigoted society. Having become involved with Wilde at a very tender age, he remained loyal even after his more mature mind advised that such a union would prove exceedingly detrimental in more ways than one. In My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, he describes the wierd [sic] fascination which he exerted over the older man. It is his contention that their companionship and affection was the outgrowth of circumstances, and that a really close relationship between them existed for only a short while. This book comprises a confession -- one of the most interesting confessions of a great man of letters of our time."
  • The Writings of Oscar Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Leonard Charles van Noppen (A.R. Keller & Co., London and New York, 1907 [University Edition 270/800]) 8.25" X 5 3/4", 209pp, grey cloth boards, paper title on spine (words mostly rubbed off), good condition for age, boards & spine faded and bumped, binding loose but holding back board loose but intact, top edge gilt, others deckled. one of 15 volumes, this one titled "De Profundis" and contains De Profundis ("from the depths", an epistle written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment in Reading Gaol, to Lord Alfred Douglas.), Suplemental Letters, Soul of Man Under Socialism (an 1891 essay by Oscar Wilde in which he expounds a libertarian socialist [social anarchist] worldview. The creation of "The Soul of Man" followed Wilde's conversion to anarchist philosophy, following his reading of the works of Peter Kropotkin.), Of Him Who Died at No. 13. (by Leonard Charles van Noppen)
  • The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter, Gaius Petronius, trans. ascribed to Oscar Wilde (Privately Printed, 1928, Limited Edition of 1200 unnumberd) 9" X 6 1/4", 236pp, Brown spine with gilt titles (mostly worn off), decorated boards with green and gilt. Deckle bottom and fore edges, top edge inked purple. Fair copy, spine cocked, binding and boards good, corners worn. Satyricon (or Satyrica) is a Latin work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry (prosimetrum). It is believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius, though the manuscript tradition identifies the author as a certain Titus Petronius. Classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. Throughout the novel, Encolpius has a hard time keeping his lover faithful to him as he is constantly being enticed away by others. Encolpius's friend Ascyltus (who seems to have previously been in a relationship with Encolpius) is another major character. It is a rare example of a Roman novel, the only other surviving example (quite different in style and plot) being Metamorphoses of Apuleius. It is also extremely important evidence for the reconstruction of what everyday life must have been like for the lower classes during the early Roman Empire.
  • The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter, Gaius Petronius, trans. ascribed to Oscar Wilde (Privately Printed, 1928, Limited Edition 343/1200 stamped in ink) 9" X 6 1/4", 236pp, black spine with gilt titles (mostly worn off), decorated red boards. Fair copy, boards worn, binding good. Front board loose but holding. Satyricon (or Satyrica) is a Latin work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry (prosimetrum). It is believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius, though the manuscript tradition identifies the author as a certain Titus Petronius. Classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. Throughout the novel, Encolpius has a hard time keeping his lover faithful to him as he is constantly being enticed away by others. Encolpius's friend Ascyltus (who seems to have previously been in a relationship with Encolpius) is another major character. It is a rare example of a Roman novel, the only other surviving example (quite different in style and plot) being Metamorphoses of Apuleius. It is also extremely important evidence for the reconstruction of what everyday life must have been like for the lower classes during the early Roman Empire.
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