Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

$25.00

Out of stock

Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, Omar Khayyam, trans. Edward FitzGerald , “Presented by Willy Pogany” (William Godwin, Inc., New York, 1933)
9.25″ x 6.25″, unpaginated (approx. 200pp), hardbound no DJ, black cloth boards with silver gilt title on spine and naked woman on front cover. Good condition, corners bumped, binding holding. Illustrations are color and fading.

This is a 1933 copy of a William Pogany’s artful presentation originally published in 1909. Pogany (1882-1955) was a prolific Hungarian illustrator of children’s and other books. Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian. About 1000 are attributed to Omar Khayyám, a Persian poet, mathmatician and astronomer. Although an important and beautiful piece of literature, it is not the most literal translation, critics refer it as “The Rubiyat of FitzOmar”. The introduction contains a poem by James Russell Lowell often considered the origin of the phrase “pearls of wisdom”.

Out of stock

Description

Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, Omar Khayyam, trans. Edward FitzGerald , “Presented by Willy Pogany” (William Godwin, Inc., New York, 1933)
9.25″ x 6.25″, unpaginated (approx. 200pp), hardbound no DJ, black cloth boards with silver gilt title on spine and naked woman on front cover. Good condition, corners bumped, binding holding. Illustrations are color and fading.

This is a 1933 copy of a William Pogany’s artful presentation originally published in 1909. Pogany (1882-1955) was a prolific Hungarian illustrator of children’s and other books. Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian. About 1000 are attributed to Omar Khayyám, a Persian poet, mathmatician and astronomer. Although an important and beautiful piece of literature, it is not the most literal translation, critics refer it as “The Rubiyat of FitzOmar”. The introduction contains a poem by James Russell Lowell often considered the origin of the phrase “pearls of wisdom”.