My Friendship with Oscar Wilde

$75.00

My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, Lord Alfred Douglas (Coventry House, New York, 1932)
9.25″ X 6.25″, 307pp., hardbound, no DJ, frontis + 5 plates, blue cloth boards, paper label to spine, title page in black and green. “American Edition” revised and corrected from 1929 version with preface by author. Good condition, binding loose, but holding, spine and boards slightly faded, corners bumped.

This is the renamed “American Edition” of the UK book, “The Autobiography of Lord Alfred Douglas”. Both books are equally rare and hard to find. From the publisher: “Like most of Wilde’s adherents, Douglas possesses a charming simplicity; an expected naiveté for one whose life has been so filled with the hates and prejudices of a bigoted society. Having become involved with Wilde at a very tender age, he remained loyal even after his more mature mind advised that such a union would prove exceedingly detrimental in more ways than one. In My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, he describes the wierd [sic] fascination which he exerted over the older man. It is his contention that their companionship and affection was the outgrowth of circumstances, and that a really close relationship between them existed for only a short while. This book comprises a confession — one of the most interesting confessions of a great man of letters of our time.”

SKU: BKWilde01 Category: Tag:

Description

My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, Lord Alfred Douglas (Coventry House, New York, 1932)
9.25″ X 6.25″, 307pp., hardbound, no DJ, frontis + 5 plates, blue cloth boards, paper label to spine, title page in black and green. “American Edition” revised and corrected from 1929 version with preface by author. Good condition, binding loose, but holding, spine and boards slightly faded, corners bumped.

This is the renamed “American Edition” of the UK book, “The Autobiography of Lord Alfred Douglas”. Both books are equally rare and hard to find. From the publisher: “Like most of Wilde’s adherents, Douglas possesses a charming simplicity; an expected naiveté for one whose life has been so filled with the hates and prejudices of a bigoted society. Having become involved with Wilde at a very tender age, he remained loyal even after his more mature mind advised that such a union would prove exceedingly detrimental in more ways than one. In My Friendship with Oscar Wilde, he describes the wierd [sic] fascination which he exerted over the older man. It is his contention that their companionship and affection was the outgrowth of circumstances, and that a really close relationship between them existed for only a short while. This book comprises a confession — one of the most interesting confessions of a great man of letters of our time.”

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