• The Complete Works of Gaius Petronius: Done into English by Jack Lindsay, with One Hundred Illustrations by Norman Lindsay: Comprising The Satyricon and Poems, Gaius Petronius, trans. & illust. Jack Lindsay (Rarity Press, New York, 1932) 9.5" X 6.5", 183pp, Hardcover no DJ, red cloth boards, botton and fore edges deckled. Good condition for age, a fading on spine, silver gilt lettering and decorations Satyricon is a work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. This edition also contains selected poems by Petronius.
  • The Satyricon of Petronius, Gaius Petronius [stated "Translated by Sebastian Melmoth (Oscar Wilde)" although some believe it was Alfred R. Allinson] (Charles Carrington, Paris, 1902 [#1/515]) 8" X 6", 421pp+1 ads, full red morroco with five raised bands and gilt title on spine, gilt monogram "TKD" on front board, marbled end-papers and paste-downs with gilt decorations on leather around edge, top edge gilt, others deckled, title page in black and red, red printed inset text throughout. Fine example of a VERY rare book. A classic work of translated Latin fiction, consisting of prose and poetry, believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius. The text details the relationship of the narrator, Encolpius and his handsome sixteen year old male lover, who is continually enticed away by others. There is some doubt whether Wilde actually undertook this translation despite the printed slip on the title page. Some consider this to be the first unexpurgated translation of the Satyricon into the English language.
  • The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter, Gaius Petronius, trans. ascribed to Oscar Wilde (Privately Printed, 1928, Limited Edition of 1200 unnumberd) 9" X 6 1/4", 236pp, Brown spine with gilt titles (mostly worn off), decorated boards with green and gilt. Deckle bottom and fore edges, top edge inked purple. Fair copy, spine cocked, binding and boards good, corners worn. Satyricon (or Satyrica) is a Latin work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry (prosimetrum). It is believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius, though the manuscript tradition identifies the author as a certain Titus Petronius. Classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. Throughout the novel, Encolpius has a hard time keeping his lover faithful to him as he is constantly being enticed away by others. Encolpius's friend Ascyltus (who seems to have previously been in a relationship with Encolpius) is another major character. It is a rare example of a Roman novel, the only other surviving example (quite different in style and plot) being Metamorphoses of Apuleius. It is also extremely important evidence for the reconstruction of what everyday life must have been like for the lower classes during the early Roman Empire.
  • The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter, Gaius Petronius, trans. ascribed to Oscar Wilde (Privately Printed, 1928, Limited Edition 343/1200 stamped in ink) 9" X 6 1/4", 236pp, black spine with gilt titles (mostly worn off), decorated red boards. Fair copy, boards worn, binding good. Front board loose but holding. Satyricon (or Satyrica) is a Latin work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry (prosimetrum). It is believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius, though the manuscript tradition identifies the author as a certain Titus Petronius. Classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form. The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. Throughout the novel, Encolpius has a hard time keeping his lover faithful to him as he is constantly being enticed away by others. Encolpius's friend Ascyltus (who seems to have previously been in a relationship with Encolpius) is another major character. It is a rare example of a Roman novel, the only other surviving example (quite different in style and plot) being Metamorphoses of Apuleius. It is also extremely important evidence for the reconstruction of what everyday life must have been like for the lower classes during the early Roman Empire.