• Les infortunes de la vertu, Marquis de Sade, introduction by Jean Paulhan (les editions du point du jour, 1946, "incidences" collection, #908/2000) 5.75" x 7.75", xlii+242pp, softcover "french wraps", good unread condition, many pages remain uncut. This edition appears to represent the original version of Justine that Sade wrote while imprisoned at the Bastille in 1787 (see below). The story is about Justine from age 12 to 26 and recounts all of her attempts to be virtuous no matter what life throws at her. She is constantly presented with sexual lessons hidden under a virtuous mask. She seeks refuge in a monastery but is forced to become a sex slave of the monks. After she helps a gentleman who is robbed in a field, he takes her back to his chateau on the pretext to have her help care for his wife. He confines her in a cave where she is subjected to more punishment. When she goes to a judge to beg for mercy in her case as an arsonist, she then finds herself openly humiliated in court, unable to defend herself. The moral(especially when juxtaposed with the "companion story", Juliette) seems to be that one should not resist a bit of vice if it is for the common good. The more Justine tries to resist temptation and be virtuous the further she was plunged into a life of vice and torture, while Juliette (her sister) submitted to a brief period of debauchery and vice and eventually lived a comfortable, happy existence. The Marquis de Sade wrote the first version of Justine (Les infortunes de la vertu, "The Misfortunes of Virtue") while imprisoned at the Bastille in 1787. In 1791 an expanded and more explicit version became Sade's first published work. In 1797, an even more detailed version was published along with a story of Juliette (Justine's sister) that comprised of 10 volumes and nearly 4000 pages. This final version, "La Nouvelle Justine", departed from the first-person narrative of the previous two versions, and included around 100 engravings. Most editions are taken from that 1797 Holland edition. Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette, and as a result Sade was incarcerated for the last 13 years of his life. Napoleon called the work "the most abominable book ever engendered by the most depraved imagination". English titles: Justine, or the Misfortune(s) of Virtue; The Misfortunes of Virtue; Justine, or Good Conduct Well Chastised; Justine or Good Conduct Will Be Chastised
  • The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade, Peter Weiss, English version Geoffrey Skelton, verse adaptation Adrian Mitchell, introduction Peter Brook (Atheneum, New York, 1965, stated first american edition) 5.5"x8.5", x+117pp, hardbound, red boards, silver titles on spine, blind stamped title on cover, top-edge inked, near mint condition This is a 1963 play by Peter Weiss originally published in German under the title Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats, dargestellt durch die Schauspielgruppe des Hospizes zu Charenton unter Anleitung des Herrn de Sade, usually shortened to Marat/Sade. This is the first American version, published in 1965. A "play within a play", Merats/Sade incorporates dramatic elements characteristic of both Artaud and Brecht. It is a depiction of class struggle and human suffering that asks whether true revolution comes from changing society or changing oneself. Peter Ulrich Weiss (1916-1982) was a German writer, painter, graphic artist, and experimental filmmaker of adopted Swedish nationality. He earned his reputation in the post-war German literary world as the proponent of an avant-garde, meticulously descriptive writing, as an exponent of autobiographical prose, and also as a politically engaged dramatist. He gained international success with Marat/Sade, the American production of which was awarded a Tony Award and its subsequent film adaptation directed by Peter Brook. His "Auschwitz Oratorium," The Investigation, served to broaden the debates over the so-called "Aufarbeitung der Vergangenheit" (or formerly) "Vergangenheitsbewältigung" or "politics of history." Weiss' magnum opus was The Aesthetics of Resistance, called the "most important German-language work of the 70s and 80s.
  • Marquis de Sade | The Man and His Age | studies in the history of the culture and morals of the eighteenth century, Dr. Iwan Bloch, translated by James Bruce (Julian Press, 1931, [first american edition]) 6 .5"x9.5", 296pp, hardbound, black boards, red and gilt title on spine, some bumps and wear, good condition for age. Iwan Bloch (1872-1922), the “father of sexology”, was a Berlin dermatologist. His many socio-cultural studies in sexology earned him an international reputation as a medical historian. He also discovered de Sade’s manuscript of the “120 days of Sodom” in 1904, which had been believed to be lost. Together with Magnus Hirschfeld and Albert Eulenburg, Bloch proposed the new concept of a science of sexuality: Sexualwissenschaft or sexology. In 1906 he wrote Das Sexualleben unserer Zeit in seinen Beziehungen zur modernen Kultur [The Sexual Life of our Time in its Relations to Modern Civilization], a complete encyclopedia of the sexual sciences in their relation to modern civilization. According to Sigmund Freud, Bloch's studies were instrumental in the development of the anthropological approach to the theory of sexuality. For example, before Bloch, homosexuality was analyzed using a pathological approach.
  • Juliette, Marquise De Sade, trans. Austryn Wainhouse (Grove Press, Inc., New York, 1968 [reprint distributed by Bookthrift, New York]) 9 1/8" X 6 1/4', 1205pp, hardbound with DJ protected with mylar, very good condition Histoire de Juliette ou les Prospérités du vice (Story of Juliette or the Prosperity of Vice, English title: Juliette, Vice ), originally published in 1797 as a continuation of Justine. Engish titles: The Story of Juliette or Vice Amply Rewarded Juliette or Vice Amply Rewarded This story was originally published with Justine as a continuation of the story. Juliette is Justine's sister. Together they are "Justine, or the Misfortunes of Virtue" and "Juliette or the Prosperity of Vice" (or "vice amply rewarded"). The two together formed 10 volumes of nearly 4000 pages in total; publication was completed in 1801 and included around 100 very explicit engravings. Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette, and as a result Sade was incarcerated for the last 13 years of his life. Napoleon called the work "the most abominable book ever engendered by the most depraved imagination". The book's destruction was ordered by the Cour Royale de Paris on May 19, 1815. Justine and Juliette were published sporadically from the 19th century into the mid 20th century but mostly without any of the engravings from the original.
  • Ethnological and Cultural Studies of the Sex Life in England Illustrated, as revealed in Its Erotica and Obscene Literature and Art, Dr. Iwan Bloch, trans. ed. Richard Deniston (Falstaff Press Inc., New York, 1934) 10" X 6.5", 434pp., hardbound textured boards with vellum spine with gilt lettering and decorations. Top edge cut, other deckled. Poor condition, boards very loose, spine detached on one side. #644/3000 Iwan Bloch (1872-1922), the "father of sexology", was a Berlin dermatologist. His many socio-cultural studies in sexology earned him an international reputation as a medical historian. He also discovered de Sade's manuscript of the "120 days of Sodom" in 1904, which had been believed to be lost. This work (Das Geschlechtsleben in England, mit besonderer Beziehung auf London), was originally published under the pseudonym of Eugène DŸhren in 1901-3 (a name underwhich he published his more controversial works). It is a detailed study of England's more esoteric sexual history, including debaucheries of court life, sexual quackery, perversions and usual practices, with the theme that repression of normal sexual urges leads to such outlets. It has numerous bibliographical references drawn from historical memoirs, literature, the press, etc., dealing with such topics as prostitution, homosexuality, sadism, masochism, flagellation and other sexual perversions. The present edition was "translated" (some say with much embellishment) by Richard Deniston. Added to it are numerous illustrations from English artist and examples including letters from Frank Harris (noted English libertine and author).
  • SIXTY EROTIC ENGRAVINGS FROM JULIETTE, Marquise De Sade (Grove Press, Inc., New York, 1969 [first printing]) 11 3/8" X 9 1/2", 60pp, hardback no DJ, good condition 1797 The Marquis de Sade published "Justine, or the Misfortunes of Virtue" and "Juliette or the Prosperity of Vice" (or "vice amply rewarded") together forming 10 volumes of nearly 4000 pages in total; publication was completed in 1801 and included around 100 very explicit engravings. Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette, and as a result Sade was incarcerated for the last 13 years of his life. Napoleon called the work "the most abominable book ever engendered by the most depraved imagination". Justine and Juliette were published sporadically from the 19th century into the mid 20th century but mostly without any of the engravings from the original. The engravings which appear in this book were reproduced from a copy of that famous 1797 Holland edition. This publication marks the first legal printing of these engravings in the US.
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