This is a store for those who prefer the old to the new;

who prefer character to shine;

who value owning and using a piece of history.

This is a store for those people and the ones who adore them.

This is a store for those who prefer the old to the new;

who prefer character to shine;

who value owning and using a piece of history.

This is a store for those people and the ones who adore them.

ForMySir.com – Unique, Classic, Vintage
  • Fanny Hill print This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition this one is from.
  • Fanny Hill print This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition this one is from.
  • Fanny Hill print This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition this one is from.
  • Fanny Hill engraving This engraving came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition they come from.  Judging by the hand laid paper and the style of engraving I would estimate it is from around the turn of the century or earlier.
  • Fanny Hill engraving This engraving came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition they come from.  Judging by the hand laid paper and the style of engraving I would estimate it is from around the turn of the century or earlier.  There is a faint secondary image at the bottom of this engraving.
  • Out of stock
    Fanny Hill engraving This engraving came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition they come from.  Judging by the hand laid paper and the style of engraving I would estimate it is from around the turn of the century or earlier.
  • Fanny Hill engraving This engraving came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition they come from.  Judging by the hand laid paper and the style of engraving I would estimate it is from around the turn of the century or earlier.
  • Fanny Hill engraving This engraving came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I am unclear which edition they come from.  Judging by the hand laid paper and the style of engraving I would estimate it is from around the turn of the century or earlier.
  • Fanny Hill print This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.
  • Fanny Hill print with quote This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I'm unsure of the edition but this seems to be a print from the 1920-30s.
  • Fanny Hill print with quote This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are also from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  I'm unsure of the edition but this seems to be a print from the 1920-30s.
  • Unknown Print [Malon Blaine?] This print came from someone's private collection.  The rest of the prints I have from this estate are from various editions of Fanny Hill by John Cleland.  This appears to be by Malon Blaine but I don't have a way of verifying that.  I know he did illustrate a copy of Memoirs of a Coxcomb (also by Cleland) [Privately Printed, Planet Press New York, 1931] which matches the paper and printing style of the period.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Privately Printed for Sylvan Press, New York 1947, limited "large paper edition" #289/1499) 8.5" x 10.75", 140pp, hardbound in black pebbled cloth with gilt titles and decorations on front and spine, original mylar dust jacket, frontispiece with tissue guard, bookplate "from the library of Louis T. Milic" Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English. Bookplate: Louis Tonko Milic (1922-2003), was a Croatian by birth. He attended school in France and moved to New York with his mother and sister in 1936 at 13. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in English and comparative literature from GSAS in 1950 and 1963, respectively, with time out for WWII, during which he learned Arabic and was a translator in Iran for the U.S. Army Air Corps. Milic taught at Teachers College from 1955–69. From 1969–78, he chaired the English department at Cleveland State University (CSU) and served on its faculty until his retirement in 1991. His studies focused on 18th-century literature. Milic’s work, A Quantitative Approach to the Style of Jonathan Swift, was among the first studies to use computer analysis in the humanities. He authored three books on stylistics, edited a number of other volumes and published more than 50 scholarly articles. Milic founded and presided over the Cleveland Eighteenth-Century Society. At CSU, he co-founded and co-edited The Gamut, a quarterly journal of ideas and information, which was published for 12 years, until 1992. Milic supported the CSU Poetry Center and helped make it an organization of national prominence. American Council Learned Societies and International Business Machines Corporation fellow, 1967; National Endowment of the Humanities fellow, 1980.
  • White Rebenque 23" long, flap is 12", white leather with rawhide/sinew stitching and decorations, slight yellowing from age. Beautiful hand-made white leather rebenque 50+ years old. It has decorative rawhide work on the handle and on the strap, using two colors of rawhide. The handle is textured by wrapping a wet cord around it, leaving an imprint on the leather. Rebenque is the name in Brazilian Portuguese for a type of whip used by gauchos in South America. Especially in Argentina, it is the traditional riding, fighting, and punishing whip of the gaucho. It consists of a rawhide wrapped wooden handle with a thong made of a leather strap a little longer than the handle. The wide strap made the rebenque an instrument less severe on the horse than the European riding crop. As the gaucho was never far from the horse, the rebenque was always on him. When not in use, he made a knot with the strap and held the rebenque lazily by the wrist strap with the middle fingers of his hand, or hung it from the handle of his facón knife (as he used the large knife almost horizontally at his back, held by the belt or waistband, the handle protruded from his right side). The rebenque was used also for fighting, as a weapon by itself, when the fight did not merit a knife, or with the strap rolled on his left hand and the handle hanging, as a secondary weapon to the knife in his right hand. Of course, it was also used for domestic punishments, and for quasi-judicial chastisement. A couple of lashes with the rebenque on the bare legs were widely used as a punishment for children, even in the urban areas.
  • Dexter no. 11 Wallpaper Seam Roller 6" long, sturdy
  • Camel Brand Razor Strop 24" x 2.5", leather strop, starting to split in middle at fold states "Camel Brand" and lower states "Certifyd | Sanitary Select | Will Beat 'em All Like Certified Checks | 100% Positive Value | Made in U.S.A. | 124"
  • A-1 Razor Strop 24" x 2.5", leather strop states "A-1 EXTRA HEAVY SHELL | Finest Selected | Hand Finished" at bottom states "188 | Peter J. Michels, Inc. Brooklyne - N.Y."
  • Fid from India 14.25" long, 1.5" at widest part, unknown wood A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing.  This fid came from India.
  • Out of stock
    Fid from India 13.5" long, 1.5" at widest part, unknown wood, with original rope A fid is a conical tool made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in seamanship. A fid is used to hold open knots and holes in canvas or to open the "lays", or strands of rope, for splicing.