People have been writing about sex since they have been writing. Often they had to do this underground or in exile. Many books have misleading title pages, stating the book was published in Paris (where it was often legal) or simply saying “Private, for subscribers” which was also a away around the censorship laws. Sometimes books were masked as anthropological or scientific work. Often books were banned and publishers went to jail. Each work of erotica that survived is a part of a much neglected (and often shunned) history. Our collection spans the mere “bawdy” to the sexually explicit both in literature and in the artwork that accompanied that literature. We also have sexology studies into the “exotic” and “perverse” sexual practices around the world often presented in an intentionally salacious way.

  • Manual of Classical Erotology (De figuris veneris), Fred. Chas. Forberg (stated Julian Smithson M. A., and friends, 1884 [later pirated edition]) 9.25"x6.25", soft covers, xiii-248pp, poor+ condition, paper cover detached, internal pages holding. This is a pirated edition of the first known English translation of this work.  The original Julian Smithson edition was limited to 100 copies. De figuris Veneris (On the figures of Venus) was an anthology of ancient Greek and ancient Roman writings on erotic topics, discussed objectively and classified and grouped by subject matter. It was first published by the German classicist Friedrich Karl Forberg in 1824 in Latin and Greek as a commentary to Antonio Beccadelli's (1394-1471) Hermaphroditus (commonly referred to as Antonii Panormitae Hermaphroditus), an erotic poem sequence of 1425 in renaissance Latin, though it was later also published as a separate work. In 1899 Forberg's work was translated into English and published by Charles Carrington as De figuris Veneris, Manual of classical erotology, and again in 1907 by Charles Hirsch, and into French, German and Spanish. The French edition by Alcide Bonneau was titled Manuel d’érotologie classique. One French edition of 1906 was illustrated by Édouard-Henri Avril, which concludes with a list of 95 sexual positions. Most of the editions were restricted to high society or censored; one of the copies edited in France was immediately deposited on the secret shelves of the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
  • Sex To-Day in Wedded Life / Doctor's Confidential Advice, by Edward Podolsky, M.D., Winfield Scott Pugh, M.D. (Simon Pubications, New York, 1947) xx+99pp, hardbound with dusk jacket, red boards with black decorations and titles on spine, very good condition for age, few smalll tears in dust jacket, interior pages and illustrations clean
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Privately Printed for the Sylvan Press, New York, 1947) 140pp, hardbound with dusk jacket, tan boards, red titles on spine, deckled fore-edge, very good condition for age, dust jacket protected by mylar, near fine two blemishes on front cover, interior pages clean Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illustrated by Charles Raymond [trans. Fernanda Savage] (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only, New York, 1928) 218pp, hardbound with slipcase, blue faux sued boards, white spine with gilt titles, deckled edges, hand laid paper, good minus condition, soiling and bumping to boards and spine, soiling and foxing to inner pages. Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illustrated by Charles Raymond [trans. Fernanda Savage] (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only, New York, 1928) 218pp, hardbound with slipcase, blue faux sued boards, white spine with gilt titles, deckled edges, dark blue slipcase with orange title on spine, very good condition for age, slipcase bumps and rubbing repair to bottom of spine, book clean, pages in unread condition with some remaining uncut Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, illustrated by Charles Raymond [trans. Fernanda Savage] (Privately Printed For Subscribers Only. 1928, limited edition one of 1250) 288pp, hardbound with slipcase,  purple boards, paper label on spine, mylar protected dust jacket, deckled edges, good condition for age, DJ has some tears and missing pieces, slipcase bumps and rubbing, split open in back, ex libris Sullivan Artemuis Ware Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English.
  • The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana | Translated from the Sanscrit by The Hindoo Kama Shastra Society | Complete in seven parts with Preface, Introduction, and Concluding Remarks | Illustrated, by Vatsyayana (Printed for the Society of the Friends of India 1883-1925, Benares-New York, one of 800, unnumbered) 6"x9", xxi+175pp, hardbound, blue boards, hand laid paper, top-edge gilt, others deckled, 8 B/W half-tone reproductions of erotic Hindu stone-sculptures with tissue guards, soiling on boards, inner pages are clean, binding is good.
  • Thais

    $130.00
    Thais, Anatole France, trans. Robert B. Douglas, illus. by Martin van Maële (Charles Carrington, London, 1901 [first english translation, first edition, limited edition, one of 500]) 6"x9", x+304pp, hardbound, blue moire silk boards with blind stamped borders, gilt titles on spine, deckled edges, Van Gelder hand-made paper, beautiful tipped-in illustrations protected by tissue guard and printed in combination of black & brown ink, good condition, bumping to corners, some sunning to spine, slight foxing to prelims, interior pages clean Thaïs is a novel by French writer Anatole France, published in 1890 and considered one of his best works. It is based on events in the life of Saint Thaïs of Egypt, a legendary convert to Christianity who is said to have lived in the 4th century. In the story, Paphnuce, an ascetic hermit of the Egyptian desert, journeys to Alexandria to find Thais, the libertine beauty whom he knew as a youth. Masquerading as a dandy, he is able to speak with her about eternity; surprisingly he succeeds in converting her to Christianity. Yet on their return to the desert he becomes fascinated with her former life. She enters a convent to repent of her sins. He cannot forget the pull of her famous beauty, and becomes confused about the values of life. Later, as she is dying and can only see heaven opening before her, he comes to her side and tells her that her faith is an illusion, and that he loves her. Anatole France (François-Anatole Thibault 1844-1924) was a French poet, journalist, and novelist. He was a successful novelist, with several best-sellers. Ironic and skeptical, he was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was a member of the Académie française, and won the 1921 Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of his brilliant literary achievements, characterized as they are by a nobility of style, a profound human sympathy, grace, and a true Gallic temperament". France is also widely believed to be the model for narrator Marcel's literary idol Bergotte in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. Maurice François Alfred Martin van Miële (1863-5 - 1926), better known by his pseudonym Martin van Maële, was a French illustrator of early 20th century literature. Though he gained notoriety with his illustration for H. G. Wells in Les Premiers Hommes dans la Lune, and he worked as an illustrator for the Félix Juven's French translations of the Sherlock Holmes series, he is now most widely renowned and mostly remembered for his erotic illustrations.
  • Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Privately Printed for Sylvan Press, New York 1947, limited "large paper edition" #289/1499) 8.5" x 10.75", 140pp, hardbound in black pebbled cloth with gilt titles and decorations on front and spine, original mylar dust jacket, frontispiece with tissue guard, bookplate "from the library of Louis T. Milic" Venus in Furs (German: Venus im Pelz) is a novella by Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836-1895), an Austrian writer and journalist. It is now his best known work and because of its themes the term masochism is derived from his name, coined by the Austrian psychiatrist, Krafft-Ebing. The novel was to be part of an epic series that Sacher-Masoch envisioned called Legacy of Cain. Venus in Furs was part of Love, the first volume of the series. It was published in 1870. The novel draws themes, like female dominance and sadomasochism, and character inspiration heavily from Sacher-Masoch's own life. Wanda von Dunajew, the novel's central female character, was modelled after his mistress Baroness Fanny Pistor.  In December 1869 the two signed a contract making him her slave for a period of 6 months. In 1873, after the publication of Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch married Aurora von Rümelin who he pressured to continue the lifestyle he wrote about in his book.  After 10 years they divorced.  Rümelin, using the pseudonym of the books title character, "Wanda von Dunajew", wrote Meine Lebensbeichte (My Life Confession) published in 1906.  It detailed Sacher-Masoch's private life and her relationship with him. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction. Most of his works remain untranslated into English. Until recently, his novel Venus in Furs was his only book commonly available in English. Bookplate: Louis Tonko Milic (1922-2003), was a Croatian by birth. He attended school in France and moved to New York with his mother and sister in 1936 at 13. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in English and comparative literature from GSAS in 1950 and 1963, respectively, with time out for WWII, during which he learned Arabic and was a translator in Iran for the U.S. Army Air Corps. Milic taught at Teachers College from 1955–69. From 1969–78, he chaired the English department at Cleveland State University (CSU) and served on its faculty until his retirement in 1991. His studies focused on 18th-century literature. Milic’s work, A Quantitative Approach to the Style of Jonathan Swift, was among the first studies to use computer analysis in the humanities. He authored three books on stylistics, edited a number of other volumes and published more than 50 scholarly articles. Milic founded and presided over the Cleveland Eighteenth-Century Society. At CSU, he co-founded and co-edited The Gamut, a quarterly journal of ideas and information, which was published for 12 years, until 1992. Milic supported the CSU Poetry Center and helped make it an organization of national prominence. American Council Learned Societies and International Business Machines Corporation fellow, 1967; National Endowment of the Humanities fellow, 1980.
  • La Grande Diablerie, poem du XVe siècles, by Éloy d'Amerval (George Hurtrel, Artiste-Édueur, Paris, 1884, #152/1000 hand signed by publisher) 5" x 6.75", 216pp, in original published state, french wraps with loose hardcover/case, red with gilt decoration, frontispiece and 3 full page engravings by Paul Avril protected by tissue guard, images throughout, good minus condition, spine cover is sunned, binding is loose and splitting in places Eloy d'Amerval (fl. 1455 – 1508) was a French composer, singer, choirmaster, and poet of the Renaissance. He spent most of his life in the Loire Valley of France. From his poetic works, the long poem Le livre de la deablerie, it can be inferred that he knew most of the famous composers of the time, even though his own musical works never approached theirs in renown.  This poem, considered invaluable to music historians, recounts a dialogue between Satan and Lucifer, in which their nefarious plotting of future evil deeds is interrupted periodically by the author, who among other accounts of earthly and divine virtue, records useful information on contemporary musical practice. In addition to listing musical instruments, he lists who he considers to be the great composers of the time: they are residents of Paradise in his poem, even though several were still alive in 1508, the date of its composition. Édouard-Henri Avril (1849-1928) used the pseudonym “Paul Avril” for his erotic work. He was a French painter and commercial artist. His career saw collaboration with influential people like Octave Uzanne, Henry Spencer Ashbee and Friedrich Karl Forberg. He is one of the most celebrated erotic artists of his age. Avril was a soldier before starting his career in art. He was awarded with the Legion of Honour for his actions in the Franco-Prussian War.
  • The Tunning of Elynour Rumming, by John Skelton Laureat, "with decorations from the drawings in colour and line by Pearl Binder" (Fanfrolico Press, London, 1928, #433/550 hand written limitation) 7.75" x 11.25", 47pp, hardbound, coarse fiber on boards (burlap?), hand laid paper, artfully done, in good plus condition for age and for the unconventional binding materials The Tunning of Elynour Rummyng is a long raucous poem written by English poet John Skelton(1463-1529). The poem was first printed by Richard Lant sometime in 1550 and presents what many would consider disgusting images of rural drinking and drunkenness. For all its gritty description, Skelton has modeled the poem on Church liturgy of that time. The verse form itself closely resembles a liturgical chant. Elynour is a character in the poem who runs a "public house," or pub. Many pubs in England had the look of a home both inside and out. In the early 16th century, the male or female owner of the pub not only sold the ale, but also probably brewed it. Elynour easily acquires all her ingredients for quite acceptable ale from the local farmers in southern England where her pub was apparently located. Nevertheless, the kind of hard language which is found in the poem, is not uncommon as "bar talk." Today, much like in the 16th century, many brands of beer have been derisively referred to as "pig piss" perhaps because of beer's pale yellowish color and its bland and very slightly bitter taste. The poet says that chickens roost over Elynour's fermentation tank and drop their excrement into the froth. The yeast will sometimes form a white cap on the fermenting beer. Alcoholic beverages are also often associated with sex and indeed will sometimes reduce the inhibitions of men and women. However, Elynour advises her female customers that the ale will make them more desirable to their husbands, in part because she has the chicken excrement in the ale. Fanfrolico Press, Australia’s first ‘private press’ in the arts-and-craft tradition, was founded by Jack Lindsay, P. R. Stephensen and John Kirtley, originally in North Sydney in 1923. The press specialized in printings artful, limited editions of classics and forgotten works that were suited to the extravagant style of artist like his father, artist, sculptor and author Norman Lindsay who illustrated many of their books. Fanfrolico was scornful of modernism and with its florid style determinedly backward-looking. They did surprisingly well, despite the lack of business expertise of their young, ambitious "bohemian" owners, eking out a living despite the risky move to London in 1926 and upheavals in ownership that saw the departure in 1927 of Kirtley, and then Stephenson in 1929.  Sometime in 1930 they published their last book.  
  • An Exact Reprint of the Roman Index Expurgatorius. The only vatican index of this kind ever published., Edited, with a preface, by Richard Gibbings, A. B., scholar of Trinity College, Dublin. (Milliken and Son, booksellers to the university; William Curry, Jun. and Co.; J. G. and F. Rivington, London, 1837) 4.25" x 6.75", 608pp, hardcover, red boards with gilt titles on spine, Index Expurgatorius title page in red and black, former library, library bookplate on front pastedown "The Reynolds Library, 1884", stamps "Literature Division", preface in english, text in latin, professionally repaired with binders tape This is an exact reprint of the Index Expurgatorius of 1608.  Aside from the extensive and scholarly preface written in English, the index itself is written in the original latin. The Index Expurgatorius is a list of books that the Roman Catholic Church forbade its members to read unless certain passages condemned as dangerous to faith or morals were deleted or changed. This is different from the Index Librorum Prohibitorum which was a list of publications deemed heretical, or contrary to morality and thus Catholics were forbidden to read. In 1571, a special congregation was created, the Sacred Congregation of the Index, which had the specific task to investigate those writings that were denounced in Rome as being not exempt of errors, to update the list of Pope Pius IV regularly and also to make lists of required corrections in case a writing was not to be condemned absolutely but only in need of correction; it was then listed with a mitigating clause (e.g., donec corrigatur (forbidden until corrected) or donec expurgetur (forbidden until purged)). Several times a year, the congregation held meetings. During the meetings, they reviewed various works and documented those discussions. In between the meetings was when the works to be discussed were thoroughly examined, and each work was scrutinized by two people. At the meetings, they collectively decided whether or not the works should be included in the Index. Ultimately, the pope was the one who had to approve of works being added or removed from the Index. It was the documentation from the meetings of the congregation that aided the pope in making his decision. This sometimes resulted in very long lists of corrections, published in the Index Expurgatorius, which was cited by Thomas James in 1627 as "an invaluable reference work to be used by the curators of the Bodleian library when listing those works particularly worthy of collecting".
  • Stag Night, by Phillips Rogers (Prentice-Hall, Inc, New York, 1946) 6" x 8.5", 230pp, hardcover with DJ, red boards with black titles on spine, DJ in fair shape, yellowing throughout, binding good [from Dust Jacket] "Stag Night is a revealing novel about an affair that the men reminisce over for a year and their wives wonder about--the annual Gentleman's Dinner at a country club." "The entire action of Stag Night takes place in one evening at a country club.  It begins with the arrival of a tightly girdled whisky-loving Mrs. Riordan ("Fatima") who has for many years given her Dance of the Seven Veils at the Gentleman's Dinner.  It ends with tactful and wise Heinz, the head waiter, bidding the police goodnight.  In between is depicted the frenzied activity of the chef and the dour bartender, the ribald behavior of some of the stags, the bewilderment of an innocent young refugee dancer, and the mounting excitement as the moment nears for the showing of lewd movies.  Tragedy in a grotesque form stalks the evening and at the climax the diners receive the surprise of their lives — and we don't mean the cops in the hall."
  • Tales of Firenzuola | Benedictine Monk of Vallombrosa | (XVIth century) | first time translated into English, Agnolo Firenzuola (Isidore Liseux, Paris, 1889) 4.25" x 6.5", xix+180pp., full soft red morroco binding with gilt borders,  decorated end papers, deckled edges, hand laid paper, frontispiece illustration not seen in any other copy online, title page in red and black, good minus condition, corners bumped top of spine is torn, .5" inch of bottom of spine is missing This copy is a rare all-leather first-edition.  I have not seen any other copies with this frontispiece and know nothing about it's origin. Originally written in Italian titled Ragionamenti Amorosi (Amorous Reasons), the Tales were written in 1523-24 on the Boccaccian premise of a group of young ladies and gentlemen gathered in a Tuscan villa to tell each other, in turn, stories dealing with love, fortune, fate, virtue, etc. The stories themselves, in their variety and immediacy, offer an insight into sixteenth-century Italian society and its concerns. Agnolo Firenzuola (1493–1545), an Italian poet and littérateur, was born in Florence, September 28th, 1493. He received his name from the town of Firenzaola among the Apennines, where his family originated. Agnolo spent his youth in Siena and Perugia, studying law and living a "life of pleasure". For a short time he practiced law in Rome, but abandoned it to become a monk at Vallombrosa. After the death of Clement VII. he went to Florence, and finally settled at Prato as abbot of San Salvatore. Some authorities have disputed that he ever became an abbot, for the records of his dissolute career do not accord with a monastic life. But whether abbot or gentleman of leisure, a severe illness took him to Prato, where he spent many happy years. He died there or at Rome, about 1545. Firenzuola wrote satirical and burlesque poems; two comedies, ‘I Lucidi’ and ‘La Trinuzia’; ‘Discorsi degli Animali,’ imitations of Oriental fables of animals; ‘Ragionamenti Amorosi,’ novelettes or tales after the fashion of Boccaccio; ‘Dialogo della Bellezza delle Donne,’ and other works. He also wrote a few love poems and ballads, one of the most admired of which is ‘Orozza Pastorella.’ Isidore Liseux (1835-1894) was a French bibliophile and publisher of erotica and curiosa. His publications were mostly rare texts of 16th to 18th century authors, hard to find and little known books which were usually translated and annotated by his friend and associate Alcide Bonneau or by Liseux himself. Liseux and Bonneau, both ex-priests, knew each other since seminary. His books were published in small numbers, on high quality paper, and with excellent typography. His usual printers were Claude Motteroz, Antoine Bécus, and later Charles Unsinger. Liseux's books were published openly as the climate was more permissive in Paris at the time. His books were so well regarded that pirates of his books and even unrelated books bearing his imprint with a false date were published clandestinely into the 20th century. French poet, Guillaume Apollinaire wrote: "The publications of Liseux are more and more sought after because they are correct, beautiful and rare." (Le flaneur des deux rives, 1918).
  • Yvonne, or the adventures an intrigues of a french governess with her pupils | a real tale [t]ranslated from the french by Mary Suckit, (stated "printed for the Erotica Biblion Society of London and New-York, 1899") 5"x6.25", 138pp, blank softcover "french wraps" protected by mylar, very good condition, some soiling and bumping. This book is similar to the description of the edition that was possibly printed by Gaucher for the Parisian booksellers.  It could be that or a pirate of his edition. From a 1901 advertisement: "Lovers of the strange and new - curious students of the erotic erraticisms of the age - men in fact, of both high & low degree, will read this book muttering of mingled marvel and surprise. This pretty booklet... is a veritable panorama of delights, showing first the emotions and sensations of incipient womanhood when the whole thoughts run in the direction of marriage and its mysteries. It contains, as incidents, Dr. Grosvit’s botanical instruction to young ladies; - his intrigue with Marie the governess of Yvonne; how they seduce their pupil, whose peculiarity and naturally lascivious nature is so easy to corrupt; botanical excursion to Meudon woods; — pisser and pisseuse - feat of love in Dr. Grosvit’s apartments; - Marie’s flying fuck, a railway adventure with a Russian gentleman; - a tale of her early life, seduction by Count Coupine; - lovely pen-pictures of the first act, and the monthly party of the Count’s friends to his chateau in the woods." Copies of the 1899 edition were seized and condemned at the Cours d’assise, Seine, on 23 Dec. 1914. Elias Gaucher (publisher from 1898 until 1925(?)) was a Clandestine editor who mainly used the pseudonym G. Lebaucher, Libraire-Éditeur, Montreal (Canada), but also Maison Mystère, Imprimerie Galante, etc. This publisher published many erotic underground works in English from 1898 to about 1904 with the mentions “Printed for the Erotica Biblion Society of London and New York”, he also published erotic texts in French from 1899. His printing press was actually located at 11 rue Danicourt in Malakoff, France. Gaucher left his works in deposit with booksellers-distributors […] Most editions of Gaucher are counterfeit editions of Brancart or Hirsch, and Gaucher often republished his own works.
  • Sappho: memoir, text, selected renderings, and a literal translation by Henry Thornton Wharton, Sappho, trans. Henry Thornton Wharton, M.A. Oxon. (John Lane [Bodley Head], London, A.C. McClurg & Co, Chicago, 1895 (third edition)) 7.25" X 4.75", xx 217pp + 16pp publisher's list, hardbound, the third edition (this being the first to have its boards decorated by Aubrey Beardsley) green cloth boards with gilt decorations and titles on spine, bottom of the spine states "The Bodley Head and Chicago" reflecting the two publishing houses, top edge gilt, others deckled. Good condition for age, binding and hinges good, newspaper article attached to front, Daily News, Nov. 30, 1915, bookseller stamp on lower front pastdown "H.K. Lewis, 136 Gower Street, London, W.C.", annotated throughout in pencil. Sappho was a Greek lyric poet, born on the island of Lesbos. The Alexandrians included her in the list of nine lyric poets. Her birth was sometime between 630 and 612 BC, and it is said that she died around 570 BC, but little is known for certain about her life. The bulk of her poetry, which was well-known and greatly admired through much of antiquity, has been lost. But, her immense reputation has endured through surviving fragments. Sappho's poetry centers on passion and love for various people and both sexes. The word lesbian derives from the name of the island of her birth, Lesbos, while her name is also the origin of the word sapphic; neither word was applied to female homosexuality until the 19th century, after this translation by Wharton, the first English translation to acknowledge it. Originally John Lane and Elkin Mathews — The Bodley Head was a partnership set up in 1887 by John Lane (1854–1925) and Elkin Mathews (1851–1921), to trade in antiquarian books in London. It took its name from a bust of Sir Thomas Bodley, the eponymist of the Bodleian Library in Oxford, above the shop door. Lane and Mathews began in 1894 to publish works of ‘stylish decadence’, including the notorious literary periodical The Yellow Book. A. C. McClurg was a Chicago, Illinois based publisher made famous by their original publishing of the Tarzan of the Apes novels and other stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Founded by Henry King Lewis in 1844, H.K. Lewis & Co. Ltd, was a publisher, bookseller, and lending library. Their members (mostly medical school students) paid a small fee and had access to their extensive library of books.
  • Les Ballades de Maistre Francois Villon, Francois Villon, illus. Chéri Hérouard, caligraphy ["escrites"] by Raymond de Rigné (chez Cres., Paris, 1919, #188/550 signed by Hérouard) 11.75" X 9.25", 169pp, original french wraps with glassine cover,  31 full page drawings by Hérouard plus 31 small vignette type illustrations. Beautifully printed on heavy deckle edged paper. good condition, all original, minor rubbing, slight foxing on outer pages, inner pages clean, rips in glassine cover at top and bottom of spine. François Villon (c. 1431_1464) was a French poet. Most of what is known about Villon has been gathered from legal records and gleaned from his own writings. He was a thief, killer, barroom brawler, and vagabond. He is perhaps best known for his Testaments and his Ballades. He was the most famous realist poet of the Middle Ages. Chéri Hérouard (1881 - 1961) was a French illustrator who was most famously known for his forty-five-year work for French society magazine, La Vie Parisienne. Under the pseudonym of Herric, he also created erotic and sadomasochistic illustrations for various books including the Kama Sutra.
  • The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade, Peter Weiss, English version Geoffrey Skelton, verse adaptation Adrian Mitchell, introduction Peter Brook (Atheneum, New York, 1965, stated first american edition) 5.5"x8.5", x+117pp, hardbound, red boards, silver titles on spine, blind stamped title on cover, top-edge inked, near mint condition This is a 1963 play by Peter Weiss originally published in German under the title Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats, dargestellt durch die Schauspielgruppe des Hospizes zu Charenton unter Anleitung des Herrn de Sade, usually shortened to Marat/Sade. This is the first American version, published in 1965. A "play within a play", Merats/Sade incorporates dramatic elements characteristic of both Artaud and Brecht. It is a depiction of class struggle and human suffering that asks whether true revolution comes from changing society or changing oneself. Peter Ulrich Weiss (1916-1982) was a German writer, painter, graphic artist, and experimental filmmaker of adopted Swedish nationality. He earned his reputation in the post-war German literary world as the proponent of an avant-garde, meticulously descriptive writing, as an exponent of autobiographical prose, and also as a politically engaged dramatist. He gained international success with Marat/Sade, the American production of which was awarded a Tony Award and its subsequent film adaptation directed by Peter Brook. His "Auschwitz Oratorium," The Investigation, served to broaden the debates over the so-called "Aufarbeitung der Vergangenheit" (or formerly) "Vergangenheitsbewältigung" or "politics of history." Weiss' magnum opus was The Aesthetics of Resistance, called the "most important German-language work of the 70s and 80s.